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High loss of plant phylogenetic and functional diversity due to simulated extinctions of pollinators and seed dispersers in a tropical savanna


Cianciaruso, Marcus V; Batalha, Marco Antônio; Petchey, Owen L (2013). High loss of plant phylogenetic and functional diversity due to simulated extinctions of pollinators and seed dispersers in a tropical savanna. Natureza & Conservação, 11(1):36-42.

Abstract

Identification of the factors driving extinctions is fundamental to conservation biology. Here, we assessed the likely consequences of extinction of pollinators and dispersers for phylogenetic and functional diversity of savanna woody plant species. Loss of phylogenetic diversity was greater than expected by chance in simulated extinctions of moth- and beetle-pollinated species, and bird- and mammal-dispersed species. In extinction simulations of bee and bat-pollinated species, the loss of functional diversity was greater than expected by chance. Two main features could drive greater loss of biodiversity than expected by chance: loss of clumped species and loss of very unique species. Pollination and dispersal modes must be taken into account in conservation plans or ecological restoration strategies, since communities may be differentially vulnerable to the loss of one of these processes. Both functional and phylogenetic components of biodiversity should be considered, as consequences of extinctions for one are not necessarily the same as for the other.

Abstract

Identification of the factors driving extinctions is fundamental to conservation biology. Here, we assessed the likely consequences of extinction of pollinators and dispersers for phylogenetic and functional diversity of savanna woody plant species. Loss of phylogenetic diversity was greater than expected by chance in simulated extinctions of moth- and beetle-pollinated species, and bird- and mammal-dispersed species. In extinction simulations of bee and bat-pollinated species, the loss of functional diversity was greater than expected by chance. Two main features could drive greater loss of biodiversity than expected by chance: loss of clumped species and loss of very unique species. Pollination and dispersal modes must be taken into account in conservation plans or ecological restoration strategies, since communities may be differentially vulnerable to the loss of one of these processes. Both functional and phylogenetic components of biodiversity should be considered, as consequences of extinctions for one are not necessarily the same as for the other.

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4 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:03 Jan 2014 11:29
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:17
Publisher:ABECO
ISSN:1679-0073
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.4322/natcon.2013.005

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