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Exploiting empirical knowledge for automatic delineation of city centres from large-scale topographic databases


Lüscher, Patrick; Weibel, Robert (2013). Exploiting empirical knowledge for automatic delineation of city centres from large-scale topographic databases. Computers, Environment and Urban Systems, 37:18-34.

Abstract

Current topographic databases rarely represent higher order geographic phenomena, such as city centres. However, such concepts are often referred to by humans and used in various forms of spatial analysis. Hence, the value and usability of topographic databases can greatly be improved by methods that automatically create such higher order phenomena through cartographic pattern recognition techniques, departing from the very detailed, geometry-oriented representations of topographic databases. As many higher order phenomena are only vaguely defined, this paper develops and evaluates a methodology to acquire definitional knowledge about geographic phenomena by participant experiments and use this knowledge to drive the cartographic pattern recognition process. The method is applied to acquire knowledge about British city centres and delineate referents of city centre from topographic data. City centres produced for ten British cities are compared to areas derived from alternative sources.

Abstract

Current topographic databases rarely represent higher order geographic phenomena, such as city centres. However, such concepts are often referred to by humans and used in various forms of spatial analysis. Hence, the value and usability of topographic databases can greatly be improved by methods that automatically create such higher order phenomena through cartographic pattern recognition techniques, departing from the very detailed, geometry-oriented representations of topographic databases. As many higher order phenomena are only vaguely defined, this paper develops and evaluates a methodology to acquire definitional knowledge about geographic phenomena by participant experiments and use this knowledge to drive the cartographic pattern recognition process. The method is applied to acquire knowledge about British city centres and delineate referents of city centre from topographic data. City centres produced for ten British cities are compared to areas derived from alternative sources.

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5 citations in Web of Science®
12 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:13 Jan 2014 16:21
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:21
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0198-9715
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compenvurbsys.2012.07.001

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