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The effects of stabilizing and directional selection on phenotypic and genotypic variation in a population of RNA enzymes


Hayden, Eric J; Bratulic, Sinisa; Koenig, Iwo; Ferrada, Evandro; Wagner, Andreas (2014). The effects of stabilizing and directional selection on phenotypic and genotypic variation in a population of RNA enzymes. Journal of Molecular Evolution, 78(2):101-108.

Abstract

The distribution of variation in a quantitative trait and its underlying distribution of genotypic diversity can both be shaped by stabilizing and directional selection. Understanding either distribution is important, because it determines a population’s response to natural selection. Unfortunately, existing theory makes conflicting predictions about how selection shapes these distributions, and very little pertinent experimental evidence exists. Here we study a simple genetic system, an evolving RNA enzyme (ribozyme) in which a combination of high throughput genotyping and measurement of a biochemical phenotype allow us to address this question. We show that directional selection, compared to stabilizing selection, increases the genotypic diversity of an evolving ribozyme population. In contrast, it leaves the variance in the phenotypic trait unchanged.

The distribution of variation in a quantitative trait and its underlying distribution of genotypic diversity can both be shaped by stabilizing and directional selection. Understanding either distribution is important, because it determines a population’s response to natural selection. Unfortunately, existing theory makes conflicting predictions about how selection shapes these distributions, and very little pertinent experimental evidence exists. Here we study a simple genetic system, an evolving RNA enzyme (ribozyme) in which a combination of high throughput genotyping and measurement of a biochemical phenotype allow us to address this question. We show that directional selection, compared to stabilizing selection, increases the genotypic diversity of an evolving ribozyme population. In contrast, it leaves the variance in the phenotypic trait unchanged.

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4 citations in Web of Science®
3 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:20 Jan 2014 08:25
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:22
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0022-2844
Additional Information:The final publication is available at link.springer.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00239-013-9604-x
PubMed ID:24309994
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-88300

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