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Rapid dephosphorylation of the renal sodium chloride cotransporter in response to oral potassium intake in mice


Sorensen, Mads V; Grossmann, Solveig; Roesinger, Marian; Gresko, Nikolay; Todkar, Abhijeet P; Barmettler, Gery; Ziegler, Urs; Odermatt, Alex; Loffing-Cueni, Dominique; Loffing, Johannes (2013). Rapid dephosphorylation of the renal sodium chloride cotransporter in response to oral potassium intake in mice. Kidney International, 83(5):811-824.

Abstract

A dietary potassium load induces a rapid kaliuresis and natriuresis, which may occur even before plasma potassium and aldosterone (aldo) levels increase. Here we sought to gain insight into underlying molecular mechanisms contributing to this response. After gastric gavage of 2% potassium, the plasma potassium concentrations rose rapidly (0.25 h), followed by a significant rise of plasma aldo (0.5 h) in mice. Enhanced urinary potassium and sodium excretion was detectable as early as spot urines could be collected (about 0.5 h). The functional changes were accompanied by a rapid and sustained (0.25-6 h) dephosphorylation of the NaCl cotransporter (NCC) and a late (6 h) upregulation of proteolytically activated epithelial sodium channels. The rapid effects on NCC were independent from the coadministered anion. NCC dephosphorylation was also aldo-independent, as indicated by experiments in aldo-deficient mice. The observed urinary sodium loss relates to NCC, as it was markedly diminished in NCC-deficient mice. Thus, downregulation of NCC likely explains the natriuretic effect of an acute oral potassium load in mice. This may improve renal potassium excretion by increasing the amount of intraluminal sodium that can be exchanged against potassium in the aldo-sensitive distal nephron.

Abstract

A dietary potassium load induces a rapid kaliuresis and natriuresis, which may occur even before plasma potassium and aldosterone (aldo) levels increase. Here we sought to gain insight into underlying molecular mechanisms contributing to this response. After gastric gavage of 2% potassium, the plasma potassium concentrations rose rapidly (0.25 h), followed by a significant rise of plasma aldo (0.5 h) in mice. Enhanced urinary potassium and sodium excretion was detectable as early as spot urines could be collected (about 0.5 h). The functional changes were accompanied by a rapid and sustained (0.25-6 h) dephosphorylation of the NaCl cotransporter (NCC) and a late (6 h) upregulation of proteolytically activated epithelial sodium channels. The rapid effects on NCC were independent from the coadministered anion. NCC dephosphorylation was also aldo-independent, as indicated by experiments in aldo-deficient mice. The observed urinary sodium loss relates to NCC, as it was markedly diminished in NCC-deficient mice. Thus, downregulation of NCC likely explains the natriuretic effect of an acute oral potassium load in mice. This may improve renal potassium excretion by increasing the amount of intraluminal sodium that can be exchanged against potassium in the aldo-sensitive distal nephron.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Microscopy and Image Analysis
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:15 Jan 2014 12:22
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:24
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:0085-2538
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/ki.2013.14
PubMed ID:23447069

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