UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Heterotopic and homotopic nociceptive conditioning stimulation: distinct effects of pain modulation


Haefeli, Jenny; Curt, Armin; Blum, Julia; Kramer, John L K (2014). Heterotopic and homotopic nociceptive conditioning stimulation: distinct effects of pain modulation. European Journal of Pain, 18(8):1112-1119.

Abstract

Background: Within an area, habituation and sensitization represent well-established modulatory effects to repetitive noxious input. Less is known regarding the nociceptive conditioning effects between body sites – i.e., how stimulating one site may affect another. Therefore, we investigated the effects of nociceptive stimulation of anatomically distinct locations (shoulder and hand) on pain rating and evoked potentials (i.e., contact heat-evoked potentials).
Methods: The effect of stimulation order was assessed in eight healthy subjects. The shoulder was examined before the hand or the hand before the shoulder. All subjects underwent both conditions (shoulder before hand and hand before shoulder) on separate days. In an additional 30 subjects (total n = 38), between retesting the shoulder or the hand, conditioning stimulation in the respective other location (i.e., hand or shoulder) was applied. Both analyses focused upon changes in the magnitude of evoked pain responses in relation to the respective area being conditioned by heterotopic stimulation.
Results: When the shoulder was stimulated before the hand, N2P2 amplitude was significantly reduced. In contrast, stimulating the hand before the shoulder resulted in significant response increments (shorter N2 latency). Additionally, conditioning stimulation of the hand resulted in increased pain rating to shoulder stimulation.
Conclusions: Overall, these findings indicate that response modulation to noxious contact heat stimulation depends upon conditioning stimulus location. These effects represent changes beyond conventional habituation due to repeated stimulation in the same area.

Abstract

Background: Within an area, habituation and sensitization represent well-established modulatory effects to repetitive noxious input. Less is known regarding the nociceptive conditioning effects between body sites – i.e., how stimulating one site may affect another. Therefore, we investigated the effects of nociceptive stimulation of anatomically distinct locations (shoulder and hand) on pain rating and evoked potentials (i.e., contact heat-evoked potentials).
Methods: The effect of stimulation order was assessed in eight healthy subjects. The shoulder was examined before the hand or the hand before the shoulder. All subjects underwent both conditions (shoulder before hand and hand before shoulder) on separate days. In an additional 30 subjects (total n = 38), between retesting the shoulder or the hand, conditioning stimulation in the respective other location (i.e., hand or shoulder) was applied. Both analyses focused upon changes in the magnitude of evoked pain responses in relation to the respective area being conditioned by heterotopic stimulation.
Results: When the shoulder was stimulated before the hand, N2P2 amplitude was significantly reduced. In contrast, stimulating the hand before the shoulder resulted in significant response increments (shorter N2 latency). Additionally, conditioning stimulation of the hand resulted in increased pain rating to shoulder stimulation.
Conclusions: Overall, these findings indicate that response modulation to noxious contact heat stimulation depends upon conditioning stimulus location. These effects represent changes beyond conventional habituation due to repeated stimulation in the same area.

Citations

2 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:16 Jan 2014 10:53
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:24
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1090-3801
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/j.1532-2149.2014.00454.x

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations