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Long-term absolute and relative survival after aortic valve replacement: a prospective cohort study


Lassnigg, Andrea; Hiesmayr, Michael; Frantal, Sophie; Brannath, Werner; Mouhieddine, Mohamed; Presterl, Elisabeth; Isetta, Christian; Bachmann, Lucas M; Andreas, Martin; Seitelberger, Rainald; Schmidlin, Daniel (2013). Long-term absolute and relative survival after aortic valve replacement: a prospective cohort study. European Journal of Anaesthesiology, 30(11):695-703.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Aortic valve replacement is one of the most common cardiac surgical procedures, especially in elderly patients. Whether or not there is a net life gain over a long period of time is a matter for debate.
OBJECTIVE: To compare survival of patients with that of the age, sex, and follow-up year-matched normal population (relative survival).
DESIGN: Single-centre, prospectively collected data.
SETTING: Tertiary care centre, Vienna, Austria.
PATIENTS: We enrolled 1848 patients undergoing elective aortic valve replacement between 1997 and the end of 2008.
INTERVENTIONS: None.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENT: Relative survival at the end of 2011 as determined by relative Cox regression analysis.
RESULTS: Sixty-nine patients (3.7%) died within the first 30 days. Another 70 patients (3.8%) died within the first year and 429 (23.2%) died during the remaining follow-up period. The longest follow-up period was 14 years (median, 5.8; interquartile range, 3.2 to 8.9). Medical risk indicators for relative survival were diabetes mellitus [hazard ratio 1.69, 95% confidence interval, CI 1.37 to 2.07, P<0.001], pulmonary disease (hazard ratio 1.45, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.81, P=0.001), history of atrial fibrillation (hazard ratio 1.35, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.66, P=.005) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor medication (hazard ratio 1.21, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.44, P=0.031). Perioperative risk indicators were urgent surgery (hazard ratio 1.40, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.94, P=0.047), resternotomy at 48 h or less (hazard ratio 1.87, 95% CI 1.29 to 2.70, P=0.001), resternotomy at more than 48 h (hazard ratio 1.80, 95% CI 1.32 to 2.45, P<0.001), blood transfusion (hazard ratio 1.06, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.12, P=0.018) and renal replacement therapy (hazard ratio 2.02, 95% CI 1.41 to 2.90, P<0.001). Relative survival was highest in the oldest age quartile (76 to 94 years) and lowest in the youngest (19 to 58 years) (hazard ratio 0.27, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.36; P<0.001).
CONCLUSION: Patients who survived the first year after aortic valve replacement had a similar chance of survival as the matched normal population. Relative survival benefit was higher in the oldest age quartile.

BACKGROUND: Aortic valve replacement is one of the most common cardiac surgical procedures, especially in elderly patients. Whether or not there is a net life gain over a long period of time is a matter for debate.
OBJECTIVE: To compare survival of patients with that of the age, sex, and follow-up year-matched normal population (relative survival).
DESIGN: Single-centre, prospectively collected data.
SETTING: Tertiary care centre, Vienna, Austria.
PATIENTS: We enrolled 1848 patients undergoing elective aortic valve replacement between 1997 and the end of 2008.
INTERVENTIONS: None.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENT: Relative survival at the end of 2011 as determined by relative Cox regression analysis.
RESULTS: Sixty-nine patients (3.7%) died within the first 30 days. Another 70 patients (3.8%) died within the first year and 429 (23.2%) died during the remaining follow-up period. The longest follow-up period was 14 years (median, 5.8; interquartile range, 3.2 to 8.9). Medical risk indicators for relative survival were diabetes mellitus [hazard ratio 1.69, 95% confidence interval, CI 1.37 to 2.07, P<0.001], pulmonary disease (hazard ratio 1.45, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.81, P=0.001), history of atrial fibrillation (hazard ratio 1.35, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.66, P=.005) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor medication (hazard ratio 1.21, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.44, P=0.031). Perioperative risk indicators were urgent surgery (hazard ratio 1.40, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.94, P=0.047), resternotomy at 48 h or less (hazard ratio 1.87, 95% CI 1.29 to 2.70, P=0.001), resternotomy at more than 48 h (hazard ratio 1.80, 95% CI 1.32 to 2.45, P<0.001), blood transfusion (hazard ratio 1.06, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.12, P=0.018) and renal replacement therapy (hazard ratio 2.02, 95% CI 1.41 to 2.90, P<0.001). Relative survival was highest in the oldest age quartile (76 to 94 years) and lowest in the youngest (19 to 58 years) (hazard ratio 0.27, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.36; P<0.001).
CONCLUSION: Patients who survived the first year after aortic valve replacement had a similar chance of survival as the matched normal population. Relative survival benefit was higher in the oldest age quartile.

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3 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic and Policlinic for Internal Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:28 Jan 2014 10:27
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:26
Publisher:Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0265-0215
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/EJA.0b013e3283657829
PubMed ID:24047727
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-89267

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