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Importance of Citrullination on hair protein molecular assembly during trichocytic differentiation


Kizawa, Kenji; Unno, Masaki; Heizmann, C W; Takahara, Hidenari (2014). Importance of Citrullination on hair protein molecular assembly during trichocytic differentiation. In: Nicholas, Anthony P; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K. Protein Deimination in Human Health and Disease. New York Heidelberg Dordrecht London: Springer Verlag New York Heidelberg Dordrecht London, 129-148.

Abstract

Deimination is a relatively new post-translational modification of proteins, whose recognition is ever-increasing. First linked to the pathology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), deimination is a process by which selected positively charged arginine amino acids are converted to neutral citrulline amino acids by the peptidyl arginine deiminase (PAD) family of enzymes.
Although the medical literature is rich with articles about the possible significance of deiminated proteins in RA, Protein Deimination in Human Health and Disease is the first publication to compile this knowledge and the growing amount of new information now known about the presence of deiminated proteins in the eye, skin, hair, gums, lung and nervous system, as well. As a result, this process has now been linked to numerous additional conditions besides RA, including cancer, glaucoma, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord and peripheral nerve injury, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, among many others.
Chronicling the earliest studies of deimination up to the present, this volume distills what is currently known about citrullination of proteins in the human body and is the first book of its kind on the topic.

Abstract

Deimination is a relatively new post-translational modification of proteins, whose recognition is ever-increasing. First linked to the pathology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), deimination is a process by which selected positively charged arginine amino acids are converted to neutral citrulline amino acids by the peptidyl arginine deiminase (PAD) family of enzymes.
Although the medical literature is rich with articles about the possible significance of deiminated proteins in RA, Protein Deimination in Human Health and Disease is the first publication to compile this knowledge and the growing amount of new information now known about the presence of deiminated proteins in the eye, skin, hair, gums, lung and nervous system, as well. As a result, this process has now been linked to numerous additional conditions besides RA, including cancer, glaucoma, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord and peripheral nerve injury, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, among many others.
Chronicling the earliest studies of deimination up to the present, this volume distills what is currently known about citrullination of proteins in the human body and is the first book of its kind on the topic.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, not refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:17 Jan 2014 08:20
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:26
Publisher:Springer Verlag New York Heidelberg Dordrecht London
ISBN:978-1-4614-8316-8
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-8317-5
Official URL:http://www.springer.com/biomed/neuroscience/book/978-1-4614-8316-8

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