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Respiratory changes due to different rocking movement frequencies and amplitudes


Riener, Robert; Omlin, X; Crivelli, Francesco; Heinicke, L; Achermann, P (2013). Respiratory changes due to different rocking movement frequencies and amplitudes. In: 21. Jahrestagung der DGSM, Wiesbaden, 17 October 2013 - 19 October 2013, 63.

Abstract

Respiratory changes due to different rocking movement frequencies and amplitudes (Einfluss von unterschiedlichen Bewegungsfrequenzen und Amplituden auf die Atmung) X. Omlin1,2, F. Crivelli1,2, L. Heinicke1,2, P. Achermann3, R. Riener1,2 1Sensory-Motor Systems Lab, ETH Zurich, Zürich, Schweiz, 2University of Zurich, Medical Faculty, Zürich, Schweiz, 3University of Zurich, Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Zürich, Schweiz Introduction. Rocking movements appear to influence sleep and studies suggests a facilitated transition from wake to sleep due to lateral rocking movements. In a recent study of our lab, investigating the effect of different movement directions on relaxation and their potential to promote sleep, an increase in respiration frequency was found. Respiration was increased in all conditions with movement, reaching values close to the movement frequency. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different movement frequencies and amplitudes on respiration. Furthermore, it was of interest whether subjects also adapt their respiration to movement frequencies below their spontaneous respiration frequency. Methods. 21 subjects (24–42 years, 12 male) were measured using an actuated bed, moving along a lateral translation. Following movement frequencies were applied: +30%, +15%, −15%, and −30% of subject’s resting respiration frequency during baseline (no movement). Furthermore, two different movement amplitudes were tested. Respiration frequency was measured with a thermistor flow sensor as well as with a respiration belt. Results. An increase in respiration frequency compared to baseline was found for all movement frequencies and amplitudes. No differences between the different movement frequencies as well as between the two different movement amplitudes were observed. Conclusion. Movements along a lateral translation induced an increase in respiration frequency. This increase appeared to be independent of the applied movement frequencies or amplitudes. Furthermore, no synchronization of the respiration frequency to the movement frequency was observed. In particular, subjects did not lower their respiration frequency below their resting frequency.

Respiratory changes due to different rocking movement frequencies and amplitudes (Einfluss von unterschiedlichen Bewegungsfrequenzen und Amplituden auf die Atmung) X. Omlin1,2, F. Crivelli1,2, L. Heinicke1,2, P. Achermann3, R. Riener1,2 1Sensory-Motor Systems Lab, ETH Zurich, Zürich, Schweiz, 2University of Zurich, Medical Faculty, Zürich, Schweiz, 3University of Zurich, Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Zürich, Schweiz Introduction. Rocking movements appear to influence sleep and studies suggests a facilitated transition from wake to sleep due to lateral rocking movements. In a recent study of our lab, investigating the effect of different movement directions on relaxation and their potential to promote sleep, an increase in respiration frequency was found. Respiration was increased in all conditions with movement, reaching values close to the movement frequency. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different movement frequencies and amplitudes on respiration. Furthermore, it was of interest whether subjects also adapt their respiration to movement frequencies below their spontaneous respiration frequency. Methods. 21 subjects (24–42 years, 12 male) were measured using an actuated bed, moving along a lateral translation. Following movement frequencies were applied: +30%, +15%, −15%, and −30% of subject’s resting respiration frequency during baseline (no movement). Furthermore, two different movement amplitudes were tested. Respiration frequency was measured with a thermistor flow sensor as well as with a respiration belt. Results. An increase in respiration frequency compared to baseline was found for all movement frequencies and amplitudes. No differences between the different movement frequencies as well as between the two different movement amplitudes were observed. Conclusion. Movements along a lateral translation induced an increase in respiration frequency. This increase appeared to be independent of the applied movement frequencies or amplitudes. Furthermore, no synchronization of the respiration frequency to the movement frequency was observed. In particular, subjects did not lower their respiration frequency below their resting frequency.

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Additional indexing

Other titles:Abstracts der 21. Jahrestagung der DGSM, 17.–19. Oktober 2013, Wiesbaden
Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Event End Date:19 October 2013
Deposited On:16 Jan 2014 11:20
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:26
Publisher:Springer
Number:1 suppl.
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11818-013-0632-y
Official URL:http://download.springer.com/static/pdf/13/art%253A10.1007%252Fs11818-013-0632-y.pdf?auth66=1390041611_ea4f66d911482ed041ec23107a085f79&ext=.pdf
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-89300

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