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Changes in body weight and tuberculosis treatment outcome in Viet Nam


Hoa, N B; Lauritsen, J M; Rieder, H L (2013). Changes in body weight and tuberculosis treatment outcome in Viet Nam. The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 17(1):61-66.

Abstract

SETTING: National Tuberculosis Programme, Viet Nam, 2008.
OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship between changes in body weight and tuberculosis (TB) treatment outcome.
METHODS: All treatment cards of patients from a sample of 30 randomly selected treatment units in the country were analysed.
RESULTS: Of 2609 patients, 2506 (96.1%) had a successful treatment outcome. The median body weight of all patients at diagnosis was 46.0 kg (25th and 75th percentiles 41-51). New sputum smear-positive TB patients with a successful treatment outcome gained an average of 2.6 kg during treatment. Patients with weight loss during the first 2 months of treatment were more likely to have an unsuccessful outcome than patients without (OR 4.9, 95%CI 3.0-7.9). Patients weighing <40 kg at treatment start who gained more than 5% of their body weight after 2 months of treatment had a significantly smaller risk of an unsuccessful treatment outcome than patients who did not (OR 0.2, 95%CI 0.05-0.96).
CONCLUSIONS: Patients failing to gain weight or losing weight, particularly during the first 2 months of treatment, require particular attention, as they appear to be at an increased risk of unsuccessful treatment outcome.

Abstract

SETTING: National Tuberculosis Programme, Viet Nam, 2008.
OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship between changes in body weight and tuberculosis (TB) treatment outcome.
METHODS: All treatment cards of patients from a sample of 30 randomly selected treatment units in the country were analysed.
RESULTS: Of 2609 patients, 2506 (96.1%) had a successful treatment outcome. The median body weight of all patients at diagnosis was 46.0 kg (25th and 75th percentiles 41-51). New sputum smear-positive TB patients with a successful treatment outcome gained an average of 2.6 kg during treatment. Patients with weight loss during the first 2 months of treatment were more likely to have an unsuccessful outcome than patients without (OR 4.9, 95%CI 3.0-7.9). Patients weighing <40 kg at treatment start who gained more than 5% of their body weight after 2 months of treatment had a significantly smaller risk of an unsuccessful treatment outcome than patients who did not (OR 0.2, 95%CI 0.05-0.96).
CONCLUSIONS: Patients failing to gain weight or losing weight, particularly during the first 2 months of treatment, require particular attention, as they appear to be at an increased risk of unsuccessful treatment outcome.

Citations

4 citations in Web of Science®
10 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:04 Feb 2014 09:50
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:28
Publisher:International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
ISSN:1027-3719
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.5588/ijtld.12.0369
PubMed ID:23146565

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