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The promise of genomics in the study of plant-pollinator interactions


Clare, Elizabeth L; Schiestl, Florian P; Leitch, Andrew R; Chittka, Lars (2013). The promise of genomics in the study of plant-pollinator interactions. Genome Biology, 14:6.

Abstract

Flowers exist in exceedingly complex fitness landscapes, in which subtle variation in each trait can affect the pollinators, herbivores and pleiotropically linked traits in other plant tissues. A whole-genome approach to flower evolution will help our understanding of plant-pollinator interactions.

Flowers exist in exceedingly complex fitness landscapes, in which subtle variation in each trait can affect the pollinators, herbivores and pleiotropically linked traits in other plant tissues. A whole-genome approach to flower evolution will help our understanding of plant-pollinator interactions.

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11 citations in Web of Science®
11 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Systematic Botany and Botanical Gardens
Dewey Decimal Classification:580 Plants (Botany)
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:24 Jan 2014 08:22
Last Modified:08 Nov 2016 14:09
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1465-6906
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/gb-2013-14-6-207
PubMed ID:23796166
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-89696

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