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Pastoral conflicts and state-building in the Ethiopian lowlands


Hagmann, T; Mulugeta, A (2008). Pastoral conflicts and state-building in the Ethiopian lowlands. Afrika Spectrum, 43(1):19-37.

Abstract

This paper draws attention to the central role played by the Ethiopian state in reconfiguring contemporary (agro-)pastoral conflicts in its semi-arid lowlands. Contrary to primordialist and environmental conflict theories of pastoralist violence, we shed light on the changing political rationality of inter-group conflicts by retracing the multiple impacts of state-building on
pastoral land tenure and resource governance, peacemaking and custommary authorities, and competition over state resources. Based on an extensive comparative review of recent case studies, post-1991 administrative
decentralisation is identified as a major driving force in struggles for resources between transhumant herders in Ethiopia’s peripheral regions.
Our analysis emphasises the politicisation of kinship relations and group identities and the transformation of conflict motives under the influence of the gradual incorporation of (agro-)pastoral groups into the Ethiopian nation-state. Ethnic federalism incites pastoralists to engage in parochial types of claim-making, to occupy territory on a more permanent basis and to become involved in ‘politics of difference’ with neighbouring groups.

Abstract

This paper draws attention to the central role played by the Ethiopian state in reconfiguring contemporary (agro-)pastoral conflicts in its semi-arid lowlands. Contrary to primordialist and environmental conflict theories of pastoralist violence, we shed light on the changing political rationality of inter-group conflicts by retracing the multiple impacts of state-building on
pastoral land tenure and resource governance, peacemaking and custommary authorities, and competition over state resources. Based on an extensive comparative review of recent case studies, post-1991 administrative
decentralisation is identified as a major driving force in struggles for resources between transhumant herders in Ethiopia’s peripheral regions.
Our analysis emphasises the politicisation of kinship relations and group identities and the transformation of conflict motives under the influence of the gradual incorporation of (agro-)pastoral groups into the Ethiopian nation-state. Ethnic federalism incites pastoralists to engage in parochial types of claim-making, to occupy territory on a more permanent basis and to become involved in ‘politics of difference’ with neighbouring groups.

Citations

29 citations in Web of Science®
37 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Uncontrolled Keywords:Ethiopia, violence, pastoralism, state-building, federalism
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:21 Jan 2009 09:54
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:45
Publisher:Institut fuer Afrika-Kunde
ISSN:0002-0397
Official URL:http://www.giga-hamburg.de/index.php?file=afs_0801.html&folder=publikationen/archiv/af_spectrum

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