UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Tissue engineering of skin: human tonsil-derived mesenchymal cells can function as dermal fibroblasts


Böttcher-Haberzeth, Sophie; Biedermann, Thomas; Klar, Agnieszka S; Pontiggia, Luca; Rac, Jürgen; Nadal, David; Schiestl, Clemens; Reichmann, Ernst; Meuli, Martin (2014). Tissue engineering of skin: human tonsil-derived mesenchymal cells can function as dermal fibroblasts. Pediatric Surgery International, 30(2):213-222.

Abstract

PURPOSE: It is unclear whether dermal fibroblasts are indispensable key players for tissue engineering of dermo-epidermal skin analogs. In this experimental study, we wanted to test the hypothesis that tonsil-derived mesenchymal cells can assume the role of dermal fibroblasts when culturing pigmented skin analogs for transplantation.
METHODS: Mesenchymal cells from excised tonsils and keratinocytes, melanocytes, and fibroblasts from skin biopsies were isolated, cultured, and expanded. Melanocytes and keratinocytes were seeded in a ratio of 1:5 onto collagen gels previously populated either with tonsil-derived mesenchymal cells or with autologous dermal fibroblasts. These laboratory engineered skin analogs were then transplanted onto full-thickness wounds of immuno-incompetent rats and analyzed after 3 weeks with regard to macroscopic and microscopic epidermal characteristics.
RESULTS: The skin analogs containing tonsil-derived mesenchymal cells showed the same macroscopic appearance as the ones containing dermal fibroblasts. Histologically, features of epidermal stratification, pigmentation, and cornification were identical to those of the controls assembled with autologous dermal fibroblasts. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed these findings.
CONCLUSION: These data suggest that human tonsil-derived mesenchymal cells can assume dermal fibroblast functions, indicating that possibly various types of mesenchymal cells can successfully be employed for "skingineering" purposes. This aspect may have clinical implications when sources for dermal fibroblasts are scarce.

PURPOSE: It is unclear whether dermal fibroblasts are indispensable key players for tissue engineering of dermo-epidermal skin analogs. In this experimental study, we wanted to test the hypothesis that tonsil-derived mesenchymal cells can assume the role of dermal fibroblasts when culturing pigmented skin analogs for transplantation.
METHODS: Mesenchymal cells from excised tonsils and keratinocytes, melanocytes, and fibroblasts from skin biopsies were isolated, cultured, and expanded. Melanocytes and keratinocytes were seeded in a ratio of 1:5 onto collagen gels previously populated either with tonsil-derived mesenchymal cells or with autologous dermal fibroblasts. These laboratory engineered skin analogs were then transplanted onto full-thickness wounds of immuno-incompetent rats and analyzed after 3 weeks with regard to macroscopic and microscopic epidermal characteristics.
RESULTS: The skin analogs containing tonsil-derived mesenchymal cells showed the same macroscopic appearance as the ones containing dermal fibroblasts. Histologically, features of epidermal stratification, pigmentation, and cornification were identical to those of the controls assembled with autologous dermal fibroblasts. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed these findings.
CONCLUSION: These data suggest that human tonsil-derived mesenchymal cells can assume dermal fibroblast functions, indicating that possibly various types of mesenchymal cells can successfully be employed for "skingineering" purposes. This aspect may have clinical implications when sources for dermal fibroblasts are scarce.

Citations

4 citations in Web of Science®
6 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 11 Mar 2014
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:11 Mar 2014 13:30
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:29
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0179-0358
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00383-013-3454-x
PubMed ID:24363059
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-89961

Download

[img]
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations