UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Transseptal conduction as an important determinant for cardiac resynchronization therapy, as revealed by extensive electrical mapping in the dyssynchronous canine heart


Strik, Marc; van Deursen, Caroline J M; van Middendorp, Lars B; van Hunnik, Arne; Kuiper, Marion; Auricchio, Angelo; Prinzen, Frits W (2013). Transseptal conduction as an important determinant for cardiac resynchronization therapy, as revealed by extensive electrical mapping in the dyssynchronous canine heart. Circulation. Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, 6(4):682-689.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Simple conceptual ideas about cardiac resynchronization therapy assume that biventricular (BiV) pacing results in collision of right and left ventricular (LV) pacing-derived wavefronts. However, this concept is contradicted by the minor reduction in QRS duration usually observed. We investigated the electric mechanisms of cardiac resynchronization therapy by performing detailed electric mapping during extensive pacing protocols in dyssynchronous canine hearts.
METHODS AND RESULTS: Studies were performed in anesthetized dogs with acute left bundle-branch block (LBBB, n=10) and chronic LBBB with tachypacing-induced heart failure (LBBB+HF, n=6). Activation times (AT) were measured using LV endocardial contact and noncontact mapping and epicardial contact mapping. BiV pacing reduced QRS duration by 21±10% in LBBB but only by 5±12% in LBBB+HF hearts. Transseptal impulse conduction was significantly slower in LBBB+HF than in LBBB hearts (67±9 versus 44±16 ms, respectively), and in both groups significantly slower than transmural LV conduction (≈30 ms). In both groups QRS duration and vector and the epicardial AT vector amplitude and angle were significantly different between LV and BiV pacing, whereas the endocardial AT vector was similar. During variation of atrioventricular delay while LV pacing, and ventriculo-ventricular delay while BiV pacing, the optimal hemodynamic effect was achieved when epicardial AT and QRS vectors were minimal and endocardial AT vector indicated LV preexcitation.
CONCLUSIONS: Due to slow transseptal conduction, the LV electric activation sequence is similar in LV and BiV pacing, especially in failing hearts. Optimal hemodynamic cardiac resynchronization therapy response coincides with minimal epicardial asynchrony and QRS vector and LV preexcitation.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Simple conceptual ideas about cardiac resynchronization therapy assume that biventricular (BiV) pacing results in collision of right and left ventricular (LV) pacing-derived wavefronts. However, this concept is contradicted by the minor reduction in QRS duration usually observed. We investigated the electric mechanisms of cardiac resynchronization therapy by performing detailed electric mapping during extensive pacing protocols in dyssynchronous canine hearts.
METHODS AND RESULTS: Studies were performed in anesthetized dogs with acute left bundle-branch block (LBBB, n=10) and chronic LBBB with tachypacing-induced heart failure (LBBB+HF, n=6). Activation times (AT) were measured using LV endocardial contact and noncontact mapping and epicardial contact mapping. BiV pacing reduced QRS duration by 21±10% in LBBB but only by 5±12% in LBBB+HF hearts. Transseptal impulse conduction was significantly slower in LBBB+HF than in LBBB hearts (67±9 versus 44±16 ms, respectively), and in both groups significantly slower than transmural LV conduction (≈30 ms). In both groups QRS duration and vector and the epicardial AT vector amplitude and angle were significantly different between LV and BiV pacing, whereas the endocardial AT vector was similar. During variation of atrioventricular delay while LV pacing, and ventriculo-ventricular delay while BiV pacing, the optimal hemodynamic effect was achieved when epicardial AT and QRS vectors were minimal and endocardial AT vector indicated LV preexcitation.
CONCLUSIONS: Due to slow transseptal conduction, the LV electric activation sequence is similar in LV and BiV pacing, especially in failing hearts. Optimal hemodynamic cardiac resynchronization therapy response coincides with minimal epicardial asynchrony and QRS vector and LV preexcitation.

Citations

10 citations in Web of Science®
13 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Cardiocentro Ticino
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:04 Feb 2014 09:10
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:29
Publisher:Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:1941-3084
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCEP.111.000028
PubMed ID:23873141

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations