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The effect of alcohol on cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in healthy volunteers


Rosengren, S M; Weber, K P; Hegemann, S C A; Roth, T N (2014). The effect of alcohol on cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in healthy volunteers. Clinical Neurophysiology, 125(8):1700-1708.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We investigated the effect of alcohol on the cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs and oVEMPs). As alcohol produces gaze-evoked nystagmus (GEN), we also tested the effect of nystagmus independent of alcohol by recording oVEMPs during optokinetic stimulation (OKS).
METHODS: The effect of alcohol was tested in 14 subjects over multiple rounds of alcohol consumption up to a maximum breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) of 1.5‰ (mean 0.97‰). The effect of OKS was tested in 11 subjects at 5, 10 and 15deg/sec.
RESULTS: oVEMP amplitude decreased from baseline to the highest BrAC level by 27% (range 5-50%, P<0.001), but there was no significant effect on oVEMP latency or cVEMP amplitude or latency. There was a significant negative effect of OKS on oVEMP amplitude (16%, P=0.006).
CONCLUSIONS: We found a selective effect of alcohol on oVEMP amplitude, but no effect on the cVEMP. Vertical nystagmus elicited by OKS reduced oVEMP amplitude.
SIGNIFICANCE: Alcohol selectively affects oVEMP amplitude. Despite the effects of alcohol and nystagmus, both reflexes were reliably recorded in all subjects and conditions. An absent response in a patient affected by alcohol or nystagmus indicates a vestibular deficit.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We investigated the effect of alcohol on the cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs and oVEMPs). As alcohol produces gaze-evoked nystagmus (GEN), we also tested the effect of nystagmus independent of alcohol by recording oVEMPs during optokinetic stimulation (OKS).
METHODS: The effect of alcohol was tested in 14 subjects over multiple rounds of alcohol consumption up to a maximum breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) of 1.5‰ (mean 0.97‰). The effect of OKS was tested in 11 subjects at 5, 10 and 15deg/sec.
RESULTS: oVEMP amplitude decreased from baseline to the highest BrAC level by 27% (range 5-50%, P<0.001), but there was no significant effect on oVEMP latency or cVEMP amplitude or latency. There was a significant negative effect of OKS on oVEMP amplitude (16%, P=0.006).
CONCLUSIONS: We found a selective effect of alcohol on oVEMP amplitude, but no effect on the cVEMP. Vertical nystagmus elicited by OKS reduced oVEMP amplitude.
SIGNIFICANCE: Alcohol selectively affects oVEMP amplitude. Despite the effects of alcohol and nystagmus, both reflexes were reliably recorded in all subjects and conditions. An absent response in a patient affected by alcohol or nystagmus indicates a vestibular deficit.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Ophthalmology Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:23 Jan 2014 07:27
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:30
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1388-2457
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2013.12.096
PubMed ID:24440226

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