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Melatonin reduces arousal and startle responsiveness without influencing startle habituation or affective startle modulation in young women


Schachinger, H; Blumenthal, T D; Richter, S; Savaskan, E; Wirz-Justice, A; Kräuchi, K (2008). Melatonin reduces arousal and startle responsiveness without influencing startle habituation or affective startle modulation in young women. Hormones and Behavior, 54(2):258-262.

Abstract

Melatonin has been suggested to affect human emotion, but conflicting evidence exists. Therefore, we tested the effect of a single dose of a 4 mg prolonged release formulation of melatonin on a biologically based model of emotional processing. Affective modulation of acoustic white noise startle (103 dB) by emotional slides selected from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) was assessed in 16 healthy young women twice, in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, balanced cross-over design. Melatonin significantly reduced startle responsiveness, but did not impact affective startle modulation, nor startle habituation. Melatonin significantly reduced arousal ratings and induced a parasympathetically dominated heart rate variability pattern indicative of a non-aroused state. We conclude that melatonin reduces arousal and startle responsiveness. However, no evidence for a direct emotion-modulating effect of melatonin was found in this healthy cohort.

Abstract

Melatonin has been suggested to affect human emotion, but conflicting evidence exists. Therefore, we tested the effect of a single dose of a 4 mg prolonged release formulation of melatonin on a biologically based model of emotional processing. Affective modulation of acoustic white noise startle (103 dB) by emotional slides selected from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) was assessed in 16 healthy young women twice, in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, balanced cross-over design. Melatonin significantly reduced startle responsiveness, but did not impact affective startle modulation, nor startle habituation. Melatonin significantly reduced arousal ratings and induced a parasympathetically dominated heart rate variability pattern indicative of a non-aroused state. We conclude that melatonin reduces arousal and startle responsiveness. However, no evidence for a direct emotion-modulating effect of melatonin was found in this healthy cohort.

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9 citations in Web of Science®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute for Regenerative Medicine (IREM)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:10 April 2008
Deposited On:30 Dec 2008 17:10
Last Modified:16 Aug 2016 10:13
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0018-506X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.yhbeh.2008.03.013
PubMed ID:18499110

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