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Antidepressive therapy with escitalopram improves mood, cognitive symptoms, and identity memory for angry faces in elderly depressed patients


Savaskan, E; Müller, S E; Böhringer, A; Schulz-Baldes, A; Schächinger, H (2008). Antidepressive therapy with escitalopram improves mood, cognitive symptoms, and identity memory for angry faces in elderly depressed patients. International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, 11(3):381-8.

Abstract

Depression is a common disorder in the elderly handicapping patients with affective and cognitive symptoms. Because of their good tolerability relative to the older tricyclic compounds, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are increasingly used for the treatment of depression in the elderly. Little is known about their effects on cognition in elderly patients. In the present 4-wk, single-centre, randomized, open-label trial we investigated the antidepressive effects of escitalopram, an SSRI, in 18 elderly depressed patients [mean age (+/-s.e.m.) 76.2+/-1.8 yr] compared to 22 healthy age-matched controls (mean age 76.9+/-1.8 yr). Affective and cognitive symptoms were assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and a face portrait recognition test to assess memory for happy and angry faces. Depressed patients prior to treatment had markedly reduced memory performance. Treatment with escitalopram improved affective and cognitive symptoms significantly. Furthermore, escitalopram treatment improved memory for negative facial stimuli. Control subjects confirmed the well- established memory bias favouring recognition of identities acquired with happy expressions. Importantly, this bias was absent in depressed patients prior to, but also after treatment. In conclusion, escitalopram, even after a relatively short treatment period, was effective in treating depression in the elderly and may help improve cognitive performance for social stimuli.

Abstract

Depression is a common disorder in the elderly handicapping patients with affective and cognitive symptoms. Because of their good tolerability relative to the older tricyclic compounds, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are increasingly used for the treatment of depression in the elderly. Little is known about their effects on cognition in elderly patients. In the present 4-wk, single-centre, randomized, open-label trial we investigated the antidepressive effects of escitalopram, an SSRI, in 18 elderly depressed patients [mean age (+/-s.e.m.) 76.2+/-1.8 yr] compared to 22 healthy age-matched controls (mean age 76.9+/-1.8 yr). Affective and cognitive symptoms were assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and a face portrait recognition test to assess memory for happy and angry faces. Depressed patients prior to treatment had markedly reduced memory performance. Treatment with escitalopram improved affective and cognitive symptoms significantly. Furthermore, escitalopram treatment improved memory for negative facial stimuli. Control subjects confirmed the well- established memory bias favouring recognition of identities acquired with happy expressions. Importantly, this bias was absent in depressed patients prior to, but also after treatment. In conclusion, escitalopram, even after a relatively short treatment period, was effective in treating depression in the elderly and may help improve cognitive performance for social stimuli.

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30 citations in Web of Science®
33 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute for Regenerative Medicine (IREM)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:30 Dec 2008 17:01
Last Modified:16 Aug 2016 10:13
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISSN:1461-1457
Additional Information:Copyright: Cambridge University Press
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1017/S1461145707007997
PubMed ID:17697395

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