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Electrochemical biosensors - sensor principles and architectures


Grieshaber, D; MacKenzie, R; Vörös, J; Reimhult, E (2008). Electrochemical biosensors - sensor principles and architectures. Sensors, 8(3):1400-1458.

Abstract

Quantification of biological or biochemical processes are of utmost importancefor medical, biological and biotechnological applications. However, converting the biologicalinformation to an easily processed electronic signal is challenging due to the complexity ofconnecting an electronic device directly to a biological environment. Electrochemical biosensorsprovide an attractive means to analyze the content of a biological sample due to thedirect conversion of a biological event to an electronic signal. Over the past decades severalsensing concepts and related devices have been developed. In this review, the most commontraditional techniques, such as cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry,impedance spectroscopy, and various field-effect transistor based methods are presented alongwith selected promising novel approaches, such as nanowire or magnetic nanoparticle-basedbiosensing. Additional measurement techniques, which have been shown useful in combinationwith electrochemical detection, are also summarized, such as the electrochemical versionsof surface plasmon resonance, optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy, ellipsometry,quartz crystal microbalance, and scanning probe microscopy.The signal transduction and the general performance of electrochemical sensors are often determinedby the surface architectures that connect the sensing element to the biological sampleat the nanometer scale. The most common surface modification techniques, the various electrochemicaltransduction mechanisms, and the choice of the recognition receptor moleculesall influence the ultimate sensitivity of the sensor. New nanotechnology-based approaches,such as the use of engineered ion-channels in lipid bilayers, the encapsulation of enzymesinto vesicles, polymersomes, or polyelectrolyte capsules provide additional possibilities forsignal amplification.In particular, this review highlights the importance of the precise control over the delicateinterplay between surface nano-architectures, surface functionalization and the chosen sensortransducer principle, as well as the usefulness of complementary characterization tools tointerpret and to optimize the sensor response.

Abstract

Quantification of biological or biochemical processes are of utmost importancefor medical, biological and biotechnological applications. However, converting the biologicalinformation to an easily processed electronic signal is challenging due to the complexity ofconnecting an electronic device directly to a biological environment. Electrochemical biosensorsprovide an attractive means to analyze the content of a biological sample due to thedirect conversion of a biological event to an electronic signal. Over the past decades severalsensing concepts and related devices have been developed. In this review, the most commontraditional techniques, such as cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry,impedance spectroscopy, and various field-effect transistor based methods are presented alongwith selected promising novel approaches, such as nanowire or magnetic nanoparticle-basedbiosensing. Additional measurement techniques, which have been shown useful in combinationwith electrochemical detection, are also summarized, such as the electrochemical versionsof surface plasmon resonance, optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy, ellipsometry,quartz crystal microbalance, and scanning probe microscopy.The signal transduction and the general performance of electrochemical sensors are often determinedby the surface architectures that connect the sensing element to the biological sampleat the nanometer scale. The most common surface modification techniques, the various electrochemicaltransduction mechanisms, and the choice of the recognition receptor moleculesall influence the ultimate sensitivity of the sensor. New nanotechnology-based approaches,such as the use of engineered ion-channels in lipid bilayers, the encapsulation of enzymesinto vesicles, polymersomes, or polyelectrolyte capsules provide additional possibilities forsignal amplification.In particular, this review highlights the importance of the precise control over the delicateinterplay between surface nano-architectures, surface functionalization and the chosen sensortransducer principle, as well as the usefulness of complementary characterization tools tointerpret and to optimize the sensor response.

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376 citations in Web of Science®
436 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:07 Jan 2009 17:17
Last Modified:17 Aug 2016 07:03
Publisher:MDPI Publishing
ISSN:1424-8220
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/s8031400

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