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Pericardial patch reconstruction of the congenitally diseased aortic valve


Dave, Hitendu; Prêtre, René (2007). Pericardial patch reconstruction of the congenitally diseased aortic valve. Multimedia Manual Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, 2007(507):mmcts.2005.001354.

Abstract

Congenital aortic valve disease manifests itself either in the course of its natural history or as a consequence of an intervention (balloon dilatation or surgery). In infancy, a congenital aortic valve presents with stenosis, in childhood and adolescence as slowly evolving regurgitation after primary intervention/surgery and in late adulthood, they re-emerge as stenosis due to natural degeneration and calcification of the fused leaflets. The surgical approach to a congenital aortic valve disease differs depending on whether it is a malformed or a normally laid down (tri-sinusoidal tricuspid) valve; it also differs depending on the type of deformity, dysfunction and valve tissue presenting at surgery. Acutely regurgitant aortic valve in a neonate or an infant after balloon dilatation of congenital aortic stenosis is an infrequently occurring difficult problem with few available options. This video presentation demonstrates a xenopericardial patch repair of the torn fused leaflet (fusion between the right and the noncoronary cusp) of a congenitally stenotic valve, followed by height augmentation of all the three leaflets. Because of the relative hypoplasia of the aortic annulus and the ascending aorta, the aortic root and proximal ascending aorta were enlarged by an oblong xenopericardial patch. The following text includes additional technical issues involved in congenital aortic valve repair. A brief summary of literature is presented.

Congenital aortic valve disease manifests itself either in the course of its natural history or as a consequence of an intervention (balloon dilatation or surgery). In infancy, a congenital aortic valve presents with stenosis, in childhood and adolescence as slowly evolving regurgitation after primary intervention/surgery and in late adulthood, they re-emerge as stenosis due to natural degeneration and calcification of the fused leaflets. The surgical approach to a congenital aortic valve disease differs depending on whether it is a malformed or a normally laid down (tri-sinusoidal tricuspid) valve; it also differs depending on the type of deformity, dysfunction and valve tissue presenting at surgery. Acutely regurgitant aortic valve in a neonate or an infant after balloon dilatation of congenital aortic stenosis is an infrequently occurring difficult problem with few available options. This video presentation demonstrates a xenopericardial patch repair of the torn fused leaflet (fusion between the right and the noncoronary cusp) of a congenitally stenotic valve, followed by height augmentation of all the three leaflets. Because of the relative hypoplasia of the aortic annulus and the ascending aorta, the aortic root and proximal ascending aorta were enlarged by an oblong xenopericardial patch. The following text includes additional technical issues involved in congenital aortic valve repair. A brief summary of literature is presented.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:2007
Deposited On:18 Mar 2014 15:17
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:33
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1813-9175
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1510/mmcts.2005.001354
PubMed ID:24414200

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