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Agomelatine is effective in reducing insomnia in abstinent alcohol-dependent patients


Grosshans, Martin; Mutschler, Jochen; Luderer, Mathias; Mann, Karl; Kiefer, Falk (2014). Agomelatine is effective in reducing insomnia in abstinent alcohol-dependent patients. Clinical Neuropharmacology, 37(1):6-8.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Sleep disorders are a widespread, persistent problem among alcohol-dependent patients and have been implicated in an increased risk for alcohol relapse. The melatonin-agonist agomelatine has been shown to improve overall sleep quality without daytime sedation. METHODS: In an off-label therapeutic setting, 9 alcohol-dependent patients with chronic sleep disorders received nightly doses of between 25 and 50 mg of agomelatine. RESULTS: After 6 weeks of agomelatine treatment, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index global score for all patients had decreased significantly from a mean (SD) of 13.1 (1.7) to 7.8 (1.7) (t = 12.8; P = 0.00). CONCLUSIONS: Agomelatine is a preparation that is not prone to abuse. The current pilot investigation shows that agomelatine might offer the prospect of becoming a valuable addition to the pharmacological repertoire for the treatment of alcohol-dependence-associated insomnia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Sleep disorders are a widespread, persistent problem among alcohol-dependent patients and have been implicated in an increased risk for alcohol relapse. The melatonin-agonist agomelatine has been shown to improve overall sleep quality without daytime sedation. METHODS: In an off-label therapeutic setting, 9 alcohol-dependent patients with chronic sleep disorders received nightly doses of between 25 and 50 mg of agomelatine. RESULTS: After 6 weeks of agomelatine treatment, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index global score for all patients had decreased significantly from a mean (SD) of 13.1 (1.7) to 7.8 (1.7) (t = 12.8; P = 0.00). CONCLUSIONS: Agomelatine is a preparation that is not prone to abuse. The current pilot investigation shows that agomelatine might offer the prospect of becoming a valuable addition to the pharmacological repertoire for the treatment of alcohol-dependence-associated insomnia.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:10 Mar 2014 12:31
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:34
Publisher:Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0362-5664
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/WNF.0000000000000007
PubMed ID:24434525

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