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Low-dose high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of facial lesions of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma


DeSimone, Jennifer A; Guenova, Emmanuella; Carter, Joi B; Chaney, Keri S; Aldridge, Julie R; Noell, Claire M; Dorosario, Andrew A; Hansen, Jorgen L; Kupper, Thomas S; Devlin, Phillip M (2013). Low-dose high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of facial lesions of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 69(1):61-65.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The use of many of the standard skin-directed mycosis fungoides (MF) therapies on facial skin may be limited by site-specific increased risks of side effects, excessive inflammation, and ocular toxicity. OBJECTIVE: Our study aimed to describe the levels of erythema, scale, and induration of facial lesions in MF before and after low-dose high-dose-rate surface applicator brachytherapy and to examine the overall clinical response to brachytherapy. METHODS: A total of 23 facial MF lesions in 10 patients were treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy doses of 4 Gy per session for a total of 2 fractions at our multidisciplinary cutaneous oncology clinic between August 17, 2009, and March 12, 2012. RESULTS: In all 23 lesions, dramatic clinical improvement was observed. Patients were followed up for a median of 6.3 months. No recurrences were reported in the follow-up period. LIMITATIONS: Long-term follow-up is lacking. Reassessment of all included patients at annual intervals for a period of at least 5 years is the authors' goal. CONCLUSION: Low-dose high-dose-rate brachytherapy using custom-made surface molds is a highly efficacious therapy in the treatment of facial lesions in MF.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The use of many of the standard skin-directed mycosis fungoides (MF) therapies on facial skin may be limited by site-specific increased risks of side effects, excessive inflammation, and ocular toxicity. OBJECTIVE: Our study aimed to describe the levels of erythema, scale, and induration of facial lesions in MF before and after low-dose high-dose-rate surface applicator brachytherapy and to examine the overall clinical response to brachytherapy. METHODS: A total of 23 facial MF lesions in 10 patients were treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy doses of 4 Gy per session for a total of 2 fractions at our multidisciplinary cutaneous oncology clinic between August 17, 2009, and March 12, 2012. RESULTS: In all 23 lesions, dramatic clinical improvement was observed. Patients were followed up for a median of 6.3 months. No recurrences were reported in the follow-up period. LIMITATIONS: Long-term follow-up is lacking. Reassessment of all included patients at annual intervals for a period of at least 5 years is the authors' goal. CONCLUSION: Low-dose high-dose-rate brachytherapy using custom-made surface molds is a highly efficacious therapy in the treatment of facial lesions in MF.

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7 citations in Web of Science®
6 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:06 Feb 2014 12:57
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:35
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0190-9622
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2012.12.975
PubMed ID:23453243

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