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Cerebellar agenesis: An extreme form of cerebellar disruption in preterm neonates


Poretti, A; Risen, S; Meoded, A; Northington, F J; Johnston, M V; Boltshauser, E; Huisman, T A (2013). Cerebellar agenesis: An extreme form of cerebellar disruption in preterm neonates. Journal of Pediatric Neuroradiology, 2(2):163-167.

Abstract

Cerebellar agenesis (CA) may result from both a genetically mediated as well as a disruptive etiology. In preterm neonates, the cerebellum is highly susceptible to injury. Different neuroimaging findings have been reported in disrupted cerebellar development in preterm neonates. We report the association of CA and severe periventricular leukomalacia in a 7-year-old girl with spastic tetraparesis, profound cognitive impairment, epileptic seizures and posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus who was born at 25 wk of gestation. The neuroimaging studies performed during the first wk of life had shown a normal structure of the cerebellum and brainstem confirming a disruptive, rather than a malformative etiology. CA is the most severe form of cerebellar disruption in preterm neonates. Differentiation between malformative and disruptive etiologies of CA is important for prognosis and genetic counseling of the affected children and their families.

Cerebellar agenesis (CA) may result from both a genetically mediated as well as a disruptive etiology. In preterm neonates, the cerebellum is highly susceptible to injury. Different neuroimaging findings have been reported in disrupted cerebellar development in preterm neonates. We report the association of CA and severe periventricular leukomalacia in a 7-year-old girl with spastic tetraparesis, profound cognitive impairment, epileptic seizures and posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus who was born at 25 wk of gestation. The neuroimaging studies performed during the first wk of life had shown a normal structure of the cerebellum and brainstem confirming a disruptive, rather than a malformative etiology. CA is the most severe form of cerebellar disruption in preterm neonates. Differentiation between malformative and disruptive etiologies of CA is important for prognosis and genetic counseling of the affected children and their families.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:12 Feb 2014 15:04
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:36
Publisher:I O S Press
ISSN:1309-6680
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3233/PNR-13060
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-91972

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