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Infections with Wolbachia, Spiroplasma, and Rickettsia in the Dolichopodidae and other Empidoidea


Martin, Oliver Y; Puniamoorthy, Nalini; Gubler, Andrea; Wimmer, Corinne; Bernasconi, Marco V (2013). Infections with Wolbachia, Spiroplasma, and Rickettsia in the Dolichopodidae and other Empidoidea. Infection, Genetics and Evolution, 13:317-330.

Abstract

Vertically transmitted reproductive parasites are both extraordinarily widespread and diverse in their effects on their invertebrate hosts. In addition to causing skewed population sex ratios via male-killing or feminization, such bacteria can further cause cytoplasmic incompatibility or parthenogenesis. Previous surveys show that the microbes Wolbachia and Spiroplasma are common in some dipteran families, e.g. Drosophilidae or Scathophagidae, and are known to be heritable symbionts and affect reproduction in the Diptera. However, little is known of Rickettsia infections and detailed surveys targeting other Dipteran families are lacking. Here 329 samples of 247 species of Diptera belonging to the Dolichopodidae, Empididae, and Hybotidae (superfamily Empidoidea) are surveyed for the presence of the endosymbionts Wolbachia, Spiroplasma, and Rickettsia. The superfamily Empidoidea contains numerous species, which have been the targets of intense research concerning reproductive traits involved in sexual selection. 151 of the species (i.e. ca. 61%) screened here, including species from key genera such as Dolichopus, Poecilobothrus or Empis, harboured one or more symbionts. Reproductive parasites are thus also common in the Empidoidae, yet effects on hosts remain unclear. Potential endosymbiont-host interactions in this group would hence be worthy of further investigation.

Vertically transmitted reproductive parasites are both extraordinarily widespread and diverse in their effects on their invertebrate hosts. In addition to causing skewed population sex ratios via male-killing or feminization, such bacteria can further cause cytoplasmic incompatibility or parthenogenesis. Previous surveys show that the microbes Wolbachia and Spiroplasma are common in some dipteran families, e.g. Drosophilidae or Scathophagidae, and are known to be heritable symbionts and affect reproduction in the Diptera. However, little is known of Rickettsia infections and detailed surveys targeting other Dipteran families are lacking. Here 329 samples of 247 species of Diptera belonging to the Dolichopodidae, Empididae, and Hybotidae (superfamily Empidoidea) are surveyed for the presence of the endosymbionts Wolbachia, Spiroplasma, and Rickettsia. The superfamily Empidoidea contains numerous species, which have been the targets of intense research concerning reproductive traits involved in sexual selection. 151 of the species (i.e. ca. 61%) screened here, including species from key genera such as Dolichopus, Poecilobothrus or Empis, harboured one or more symbionts. Reproductive parasites are thus also common in the Empidoidae, yet effects on hosts remain unclear. Potential endosymbiont-host interactions in this group would hence be worthy of further investigation.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:11 Feb 2014 13:37
Last Modified:23 Aug 2016 07:00
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1567-1348
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.meegid.2012.11.005
PubMed ID:23183308
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-92221

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