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Temperature and population density effects on locomotor activity of Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae)


Schou, T M; Faurby, S; Kjærsgaard, A; Pertoldi, C; Loeschcke, V; Hald, B; Bahrndorff, S (2013). Temperature and population density effects on locomotor activity of Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae). Environmental Entomology, 42(6):1322-1328.

Abstract

The behavior of ectotherm organisms is affected by both abiotic and biotic factors. However, a limited number of studies have investigated the synergistic effects on behavioral traits. This study examined the effect of temperature and density on locomotor activity of Musca domestica (L.). Locomotor activity was measured for both sexes and at four densities (with mixed sexes) during a full light and dark (L:D) cycle at temperatures ranging from 10 to 40ºC. Locomotor activity during daytime increased with temperature at all densities until reaching 30ºC and then decreased. Highdensity treatments significantly reduced the locomotor activity per fly, except at 15ºC. For both sexes, daytime activity also increased with temperature until reaching 30 and 35ºC for males and females, respectively, and thereafter decreased. Furthermore, males showed a significantly higher and more predictable locomotor activity than females. During nighttime, locomotor activity was considerably lower for all treatments. Altogether the results of the current study show that there is a significant interaction of temperature and density on daytime locomotor activity of M. domestica and that houseflies are likely to show significant changes in locomotor activity with change in temperature.

Abstract

The behavior of ectotherm organisms is affected by both abiotic and biotic factors. However, a limited number of studies have investigated the synergistic effects on behavioral traits. This study examined the effect of temperature and density on locomotor activity of Musca domestica (L.). Locomotor activity was measured for both sexes and at four densities (with mixed sexes) during a full light and dark (L:D) cycle at temperatures ranging from 10 to 40ºC. Locomotor activity during daytime increased with temperature at all densities until reaching 30ºC and then decreased. Highdensity treatments significantly reduced the locomotor activity per fly, except at 15ºC. For both sexes, daytime activity also increased with temperature until reaching 30 and 35ºC for males and females, respectively, and thereafter decreased. Furthermore, males showed a significantly higher and more predictable locomotor activity than females. During nighttime, locomotor activity was considerably lower for all treatments. Altogether the results of the current study show that there is a significant interaction of temperature and density on daytime locomotor activity of M. domestica and that houseflies are likely to show significant changes in locomotor activity with change in temperature.

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6 citations in Web of Science®
6 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:11 Feb 2014 13:55
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:38
Publisher:Entomological Society of America
ISSN:0046-225X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1603/EN13039
PubMed ID:24246478

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