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Age-dependent changes in sleep EEG topography.


Landolt, H P; Borbely, A A (2001). Age-dependent changes in sleep EEG topography. Clinical Neurophysiology, 112(2):369-377.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To assess age-related topographic changes in the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG). METHODS: The sleep EEG records of young (mean age, 22.3 years) and middle-aged (mean age, 62.0 years) healthy men were compared. The EEG was obtained from 3 bipolar derivations (frontal-central (FC), central-parietal (CP), and parietal-occipital (PO)) along the antero-posterior axis. RESULTS: The total sleep time, sleep efficiency, stage 2 and slow wave sleep (SWS) were lower in the middle-aged group, while sleep latency, stage 1 and wakefulness after sleep onset were higher. Spectral analysis documented the age-related reduction of EEG power in non-REM sleep (0.25-14 Hz), and REM sleep (0.75-10 Hz). However, the reduction was not uniform over the 3 derivations, but was most pronounced in the anterior derivation (FC) in the theta (both sleep states) and high-alpha/low-sigma bands (non-REM sleep). CONCLUSIONS: These changes can be interpreted as age-related shifts of power from the anterior (FC) towards the middle derivation (CP). Aging not only reduces power in the sleep EEG, but causes frequency-specific changes in the brain topography. The results are consistent with the notion of sleep as a local process.

OBJECTIVE: To assess age-related topographic changes in the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG). METHODS: The sleep EEG records of young (mean age, 22.3 years) and middle-aged (mean age, 62.0 years) healthy men were compared. The EEG was obtained from 3 bipolar derivations (frontal-central (FC), central-parietal (CP), and parietal-occipital (PO)) along the antero-posterior axis. RESULTS: The total sleep time, sleep efficiency, stage 2 and slow wave sleep (SWS) were lower in the middle-aged group, while sleep latency, stage 1 and wakefulness after sleep onset were higher. Spectral analysis documented the age-related reduction of EEG power in non-REM sleep (0.25-14 Hz), and REM sleep (0.75-10 Hz). However, the reduction was not uniform over the 3 derivations, but was most pronounced in the anterior derivation (FC) in the theta (both sleep states) and high-alpha/low-sigma bands (non-REM sleep). CONCLUSIONS: These changes can be interpreted as age-related shifts of power from the anterior (FC) towards the middle derivation (CP). Aging not only reduces power in the sleep EEG, but causes frequency-specific changes in the brain topography. The results are consistent with the notion of sleep as a local process.

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60 citations in Web of Science®
66 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 February 2001
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:19
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:16
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1388-2457
Publisher DOI:10.1016/S1388-2457(00)00542-3
PubMed ID:11165543

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