UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Practical approach to early postoperative management of lung transplant recipients


Schuurmans, Macé M; Benden, Christian; Inci, Ilhan (2013). Practical approach to early postoperative management of lung transplant recipients. Swiss Medical Weekly, 143:w13773.

Abstract

Meticulous attention to detail during the early postoperative period after lung transplantation is crucial for the overall success of the procedure. It starts in the intensive care unit with the initiation of immunosuppression, implementation of anti-infective strategies and stabilisation of respiratory function. The subsequent days and weeks on the regular ward focus on titration of immunosuppressive drugs, vigilant fluid management, early mobilisation and initiation of physiotherapy. In parallel, the lung transplant recipients are actively taught about self-monitoring and self-management strategies to allow for a smooth transition to outpatient follow-up care. This article intends to communicate the practical aspects and principles of the patient management used at the authors' centre on a daily basis by a multi-disciplinary transplant team, having at its core both a transplant pulmonologist and a thoracic surgeon. It focuses on the first month after lung transplantation, but does not cover surgical techniques, rare complications or long-term management issues of lung transplant recipients. The target audience of this practical guide are advanced trainees of pulmonology, thoracic surgery, intensive care, anaesthesiology and other clinicians involved in the early postoperative care of lung transplant recipients either in the intensive care unit or on the peripheral ward.

Abstract

Meticulous attention to detail during the early postoperative period after lung transplantation is crucial for the overall success of the procedure. It starts in the intensive care unit with the initiation of immunosuppression, implementation of anti-infective strategies and stabilisation of respiratory function. The subsequent days and weeks on the regular ward focus on titration of immunosuppressive drugs, vigilant fluid management, early mobilisation and initiation of physiotherapy. In parallel, the lung transplant recipients are actively taught about self-monitoring and self-management strategies to allow for a smooth transition to outpatient follow-up care. This article intends to communicate the practical aspects and principles of the patient management used at the authors' centre on a daily basis by a multi-disciplinary transplant team, having at its core both a transplant pulmonologist and a thoracic surgeon. It focuses on the first month after lung transplantation, but does not cover surgical techniques, rare complications or long-term management issues of lung transplant recipients. The target audience of this practical guide are advanced trainees of pulmonology, thoracic surgery, intensive care, anaesthesiology and other clinicians involved in the early postoperative care of lung transplant recipients either in the intensive care unit or on the peripheral ward.

Citations

8 citations in Web of Science®
9 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

32 downloads since deposited on 12 Feb 2014
16 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Pneumology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:12 Feb 2014 12:58
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:39
Publisher:EMH Swiss Medical Publishers
ISSN:0036-7672
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.4414/smw.2013.13773
PubMed ID:23572438

Download

[img]
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 446kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations