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Olfactory behavior and physiology are disrupted in prion protein knockout mice


Le Pichon, C E; Valley, M T; Polymenidou, M; Chesler, A T; Sagdullaev, B T; Aguzzi, A; Firestein, S (2008). Olfactory behavior and physiology are disrupted in prion protein knockout mice. Nature Neuroscience, 12(1):60-69.

Abstract

The prion protein PrP(C) is infamous for its role in disease, but its normal physiological function remains unknown. Here we found a previously unknown behavioral phenotype of Prnp(-/-) mice in an odor-guided task. This phenotype was manifest in three Prnp knockout lines on different genetic backgrounds, which provides strong evidence that the phenotype is caused by a lack of PrP(C) rather than by other genetic factors. Prnp(-/-) mice also showed altered behavior in a second olfactory task, suggesting that the phenotype is olfactory specific. Furthermore, PrP(C) deficiency affected oscillatory activity in the deep layers of the main olfactory bulb, as well as dendrodendritic synaptic transmission between olfactory bulb granule and mitral cells. Notably, both the behavioral and electrophysiological alterations found in Prnp(-/-) mice were rescued by transgenic neuronal-specific expression of PrP(C). These data suggest that PrP(C) is important in the normal processing of sensory information by the olfactory system.

The prion protein PrP(C) is infamous for its role in disease, but its normal physiological function remains unknown. Here we found a previously unknown behavioral phenotype of Prnp(-/-) mice in an odor-guided task. This phenotype was manifest in three Prnp knockout lines on different genetic backgrounds, which provides strong evidence that the phenotype is caused by a lack of PrP(C) rather than by other genetic factors. Prnp(-/-) mice also showed altered behavior in a second olfactory task, suggesting that the phenotype is olfactory specific. Furthermore, PrP(C) deficiency affected oscillatory activity in the deep layers of the main olfactory bulb, as well as dendrodendritic synaptic transmission between olfactory bulb granule and mitral cells. Notably, both the behavioral and electrophysiological alterations found in Prnp(-/-) mice were rescued by transgenic neuronal-specific expression of PrP(C). These data suggest that PrP(C) is important in the normal processing of sensory information by the olfactory system.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Neuropathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:28 Jan 2009 10:43
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:46
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:1097-6256
Publisher DOI:10.1038/nn.2238
PubMed ID:19098904
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-9280

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