UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Therapeutic effects of deleting cancer-associated fibroblasts in cholangiocarcinoma


Mertens, Joachim C; Fingas, Christian D; Christensen, John D; Smoot, Rory L; Bronk, Steven F; Werneburg, Nathan W; Gustafson, Michael P; Dietz, Allan B; Roberts, Lewis R; Sirica, Alphonse E; Gores, Gregory J (2013). Therapeutic effects of deleting cancer-associated fibroblasts in cholangiocarcinoma. Cancer Research, 73(2):897-907.

Abstract

Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) are abundant in the stroma of desmoplastic cancers where they promote tumor progression. CAFs are "activated" and as such may be uniquely susceptible to apoptosis. Using cholangiocarcinoma as a desmoplastic tumor model, we investigated the sensitivity of liver CAFs to the cytotoxic drug navitoclax, a BH3 mimetic. Navitoclax induced apoptosis in CAF and in myofibroblastic human hepatic stellate cells but lacked similar effects in quiescent fibroblasts or cholangiocarcinoma cells. Unlike cholangiocarcinoma cells, neither CAF nor quiescent fibroblasts expressed Mcl-1, a known resistance factor for navitoclax cytotoxicity. Explaining this paradox, we found that mitochondria isolated from CAFs or cells treated with navitoclax both released the apoptogenic factors Smac and cytochrome c, suggesting that they are primed for cell death. Such death priming in CAFs appeared to be due, in part, to upregulation of the proapoptotic protein Bax. Short hairpin RNA-mediated attenuation of Bax repressed navitoclax-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction, release of apoptogenic factors, and apoptotic cell death. In a syngeneic rat model of cholangiocarcinoma, navitoclax treatment triggered CAF apoptosis, diminishing expression of the desmoplastic extracellular matrix protein tenascin C, suppressing tumor outgrowth, and improving host survival. Together, our findings argue that navitoclax may be useful for destroying CAFs in the tumor microenvironment as a general strategy to attack solid tumors.

Abstract

Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) are abundant in the stroma of desmoplastic cancers where they promote tumor progression. CAFs are "activated" and as such may be uniquely susceptible to apoptosis. Using cholangiocarcinoma as a desmoplastic tumor model, we investigated the sensitivity of liver CAFs to the cytotoxic drug navitoclax, a BH3 mimetic. Navitoclax induced apoptosis in CAF and in myofibroblastic human hepatic stellate cells but lacked similar effects in quiescent fibroblasts or cholangiocarcinoma cells. Unlike cholangiocarcinoma cells, neither CAF nor quiescent fibroblasts expressed Mcl-1, a known resistance factor for navitoclax cytotoxicity. Explaining this paradox, we found that mitochondria isolated from CAFs or cells treated with navitoclax both released the apoptogenic factors Smac and cytochrome c, suggesting that they are primed for cell death. Such death priming in CAFs appeared to be due, in part, to upregulation of the proapoptotic protein Bax. Short hairpin RNA-mediated attenuation of Bax repressed navitoclax-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction, release of apoptogenic factors, and apoptotic cell death. In a syngeneic rat model of cholangiocarcinoma, navitoclax treatment triggered CAF apoptosis, diminishing expression of the desmoplastic extracellular matrix protein tenascin C, suppressing tumor outgrowth, and improving host survival. Together, our findings argue that navitoclax may be useful for destroying CAFs in the tumor microenvironment as a general strategy to attack solid tumors.

Citations

29 citations in Web of Science®
35 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

33 downloads since deposited on 20 Feb 2014
17 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:20 Feb 2014 11:11
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:40
Publisher:American Association for Cancer Research
ISSN:0008-5472
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-12-2130
PubMed ID:23221385

Download

[img]
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations