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In vivo laser assisted microvascular repair and end-to-end anastomosis by means of indocyanine green-infused chitosan patches: a pilot study


Esposito, Giuseppe; Rossi, Francesca; Matteini, Paolo; Scerrati, Alba; Puca, Alfredo; Albanese, Alessio; Rossi, Giacomo; Ratto, Fulvio; Maira, Giulio; Pini, Roberto (2013). In vivo laser assisted microvascular repair and end-to-end anastomosis by means of indocyanine green-infused chitosan patches: a pilot study. Lasers in surgery and medicine, 45(5):318-325.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Laser-based repairing techniques offer several advantages respect to standard suturing in microsurgery. In this work we evaluate the applicability and feasibility of two innovative laser-based approaches for microvascular repair and anastomoses: (1) laser-assisted vascular repair (LAVR); (2) laser-assisted end-to-end vascular anastomosis (LAVA). All these procedures have been executed by the use of diode laser irradiation and chitosan-patches infused with Indocyanine Green (ICG).
STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS: Experiments were performed on 30 rabbits. Twenty animals underwent LAVR and 10 end-to-end LAVA procedures. In the LAVR group, a 5-mm longitudinal cut was performed on the common carotid artery (CCA), then an ICG-infused chitosan patch was topically applied and laser-soldered over the arterial lesion. In the LAVA group the end-to-end anastomosis was executed on CCA by means of application of the three interrupted sutures and subsequent laser soldering of the ICG-infused patch. Animals underwent different follow-up periods (2, 7, 30, and 90 days). At the end of every follow-up, the animals were re-anesthetized and a microdoppler analysis was performed in order to check patency of the treated vessels. Then soldered segments were excised and subjected to histological and ultrastructural evaluations.
RESULTS: At the end of surgery no bleeding from the treated segment was observed; all the treated vessels were patent. At the end of follow-up periods, no signs of perivascular haemorrhage were found. An intraoperative microdoppler evaluation assessed the patency of all the treated vessels. Histology showed a good reorganization of the vascular wall structures and an early endothelial regeneration was observed by SEM.
CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrated the efficacy of laser tissue soldering by means of ICG-infused chitosan patches for the in vivo repairing of microvascular lesions and end-to-end anastomoses. This approach offers several advantages over conventional suturing methods and is technically easy to perform, minimizing the surgical trauma to vessels.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Laser-based repairing techniques offer several advantages respect to standard suturing in microsurgery. In this work we evaluate the applicability and feasibility of two innovative laser-based approaches for microvascular repair and anastomoses: (1) laser-assisted vascular repair (LAVR); (2) laser-assisted end-to-end vascular anastomosis (LAVA). All these procedures have been executed by the use of diode laser irradiation and chitosan-patches infused with Indocyanine Green (ICG).
STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS: Experiments were performed on 30 rabbits. Twenty animals underwent LAVR and 10 end-to-end LAVA procedures. In the LAVR group, a 5-mm longitudinal cut was performed on the common carotid artery (CCA), then an ICG-infused chitosan patch was topically applied and laser-soldered over the arterial lesion. In the LAVA group the end-to-end anastomosis was executed on CCA by means of application of the three interrupted sutures and subsequent laser soldering of the ICG-infused patch. Animals underwent different follow-up periods (2, 7, 30, and 90 days). At the end of every follow-up, the animals were re-anesthetized and a microdoppler analysis was performed in order to check patency of the treated vessels. Then soldered segments were excised and subjected to histological and ultrastructural evaluations.
RESULTS: At the end of surgery no bleeding from the treated segment was observed; all the treated vessels were patent. At the end of follow-up periods, no signs of perivascular haemorrhage were found. An intraoperative microdoppler evaluation assessed the patency of all the treated vessels. Histology showed a good reorganization of the vascular wall structures and an early endothelial regeneration was observed by SEM.
CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrated the efficacy of laser tissue soldering by means of ICG-infused chitosan patches for the in vivo repairing of microvascular lesions and end-to-end anastomoses. This approach offers several advantages over conventional suturing methods and is technically easy to perform, minimizing the surgical trauma to vessels.

Citations

11 citations in Web of Science®
13 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurosurgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:2013
Deposited On:13 Mar 2014 13:53
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:40
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0196-8092
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/lsm.22145
PubMed ID:23740739

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