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Impact of different domains of physical activity on cause-specific mortality: A longitudinal study


Wanner, Miriam; Tarnutzer, Silvan; Martin, Brian W; Braun, Julia; Rohrmann, Sabine; Bopp, Matthias; Faeh, David (2014). Impact of different domains of physical activity on cause-specific mortality: A longitudinal study. Preventive Medicine, 62:89-95.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the associations between different domains of physical activity and all-cause, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer mortality.
METHODS: Participants (n=17,663, aged 16-92years) of two general population health studies conducted between 1977 and 1993 in Switzerland were included. Physical activity was assessed at baseline in the domains of commuting to work, work-related physical activity, and leisure-time physical activity (including leisure-time activity level and sport activity). A median follow-up time of 20.2years was obtained with anonymous record linkage providing 3878 deaths (CVD: 1357; cancer: 1351). Adjusted Cox proportional hazard models were calculated.
RESULTS: There were no significant associations between commuting and work-related physical activities, respectively, and mortality. Leisure-time activity level was associated with all-cause mortality in men [adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 0.75, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.63-0.89] and women [HR 0.82 (0.74-0.91)], with CVD mortality in women only [HR 0.79 (0.67-0.94)] and with cancer mortality in men only [HR 0.63 (0.47-0.86)]. Sport activity was associated with all-cause, CVD and cancer mortality in men [HR ranged between 0.76 (0.63-0.92) and 0.85 (0.76-0.95)], but not in women.
CONCLUSIONS: These results underline the public health relevance of physical activity for the prevention of CVD and cancer, especially regarding leisure-time physical activity.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the associations between different domains of physical activity and all-cause, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer mortality.
METHODS: Participants (n=17,663, aged 16-92years) of two general population health studies conducted between 1977 and 1993 in Switzerland were included. Physical activity was assessed at baseline in the domains of commuting to work, work-related physical activity, and leisure-time physical activity (including leisure-time activity level and sport activity). A median follow-up time of 20.2years was obtained with anonymous record linkage providing 3878 deaths (CVD: 1357; cancer: 1351). Adjusted Cox proportional hazard models were calculated.
RESULTS: There were no significant associations between commuting and work-related physical activities, respectively, and mortality. Leisure-time activity level was associated with all-cause mortality in men [adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 0.75, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.63-0.89] and women [HR 0.82 (0.74-0.91)], with CVD mortality in women only [HR 0.79 (0.67-0.94)] and with cancer mortality in men only [HR 0.63 (0.47-0.86)]. Sport activity was associated with all-cause, CVD and cancer mortality in men [HR ranged between 0.76 (0.63-0.92) and 0.85 (0.76-0.95)], but not in women.
CONCLUSIONS: These results underline the public health relevance of physical activity for the prevention of CVD and cancer, especially regarding leisure-time physical activity.

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6 citations in Web of Science®
8 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:07 Mar 2014 14:22
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:41
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0091-7435
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.01.025
PubMed ID:24513168

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