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Cue type affects preparatory influences on task inhibition


Gade, Miriam; Koch, Iring (2014). Cue type affects preparatory influences on task inhibition. Acta Psychologica, 148:12-18.

Abstract

The present study investigates the influence of preparation on inhibitory effects in cued task switching. In three experiments, we assessed n-2 repetition costs as marker of inhibition of the just executed and now irrelevant task by comparing performance in task sequences such as ABA (i.e., n-2 repetitions, with A, B and C standing for different tasks) to task sequences such as CBA (i.e., n-2 switches). Specifically, we varied the cue-target interval (CTI) to examine cue-based preparation effects. In addition, we manipulated cue type (i.e., abstract, verbal, and direct cues) across the three experiments. We obtained significant reductions of n-2 repetition costs with prolonged CTI when using abstract cues (i.e., coloured frames) and task names (i.e., digit), but not when using the task-specific stimulus-response mapping as cue for the upcoming task. These data suggest that cue-based preparation is not a uniform process but depends on the information provided by the cue.

Abstract

The present study investigates the influence of preparation on inhibitory effects in cued task switching. In three experiments, we assessed n-2 repetition costs as marker of inhibition of the just executed and now irrelevant task by comparing performance in task sequences such as ABA (i.e., n-2 repetitions, with A, B and C standing for different tasks) to task sequences such as CBA (i.e., n-2 switches). Specifically, we varied the cue-target interval (CTI) to examine cue-based preparation effects. In addition, we manipulated cue type (i.e., abstract, verbal, and direct cues) across the three experiments. We obtained significant reductions of n-2 repetition costs with prolonged CTI when using abstract cues (i.e., coloured frames) and task names (i.e., digit), but not when using the task-specific stimulus-response mapping as cue for the upcoming task. These data suggest that cue-based preparation is not a uniform process but depends on the information provided by the cue.

Citations

4 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:07 Mar 2014 14:00
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:42
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0001-6918
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actpsy.2013.12.009
PubMed ID:24486802

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