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Analysis of cell-cell contact mediated by Ig superfamily cell adhesion molecules


Stoeckli, Esther T; Kilinc, Devrim; Kunz, Beat; Kunz, Stefan; Lee, Gil U; Martines, Elena; Rader, Christoph; Suter, Daniel (2013). Analysis of cell-cell contact mediated by Ig superfamily cell adhesion molecules. Current Protocols in Cell Biology, 61:9.5.1-9.5.85.

Abstract

Cell-cell adhesion is a fundamental requirement for all multicellular organisms. The calcium-independent cell adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF-CAMs) represent a major subgroup. They consist of immunoglobulin folds alone or in combination with other protein modules, often fibronectin type-III folds. More than 100 IgSF-CAMs have been identified in vertebrates and invertebrates. Most of the IgSF-CAMs are cell surface molecules that are membrane-anchored either by a single transmembrane segment or by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. Some of the IgSF-CAMs also occur in soluble form, e.g., in the cerebrospinal fluid or in the vitreous fluid of the eye, due to naturally occurring cleavage of the GPI anchor or the membrane-proximal peptide segment. Some IgSF-CAMs, such as NCAM, occur in various forms that are generated by alternative splicing. This unit contains a series of protocols that have been used to study the function of IgSF-CAMs in vitro and in vivo. Curr. Protoc. Cell Biol. 61:9.5.1-9.5.85. © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Abstract

Cell-cell adhesion is a fundamental requirement for all multicellular organisms. The calcium-independent cell adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF-CAMs) represent a major subgroup. They consist of immunoglobulin folds alone or in combination with other protein modules, often fibronectin type-III folds. More than 100 IgSF-CAMs have been identified in vertebrates and invertebrates. Most of the IgSF-CAMs are cell surface molecules that are membrane-anchored either by a single transmembrane segment or by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. Some of the IgSF-CAMs also occur in soluble form, e.g., in the cerebrospinal fluid or in the vitreous fluid of the eye, due to naturally occurring cleavage of the GPI anchor or the membrane-proximal peptide segment. Some IgSF-CAMs, such as NCAM, occur in various forms that are generated by alternative splicing. This unit contains a series of protocols that have been used to study the function of IgSF-CAMs in vitro and in vivo. Curr. Protoc. Cell Biol. 61:9.5.1-9.5.85. © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Life Sciences
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2 December 2013
Deposited On:21 Feb 2014 10:10
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:42
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1934-2616
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/0471143030.cb0905s61
PubMed ID:24510806

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