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Endoscope-integrated ICG technology: first application during intracranial aneurysm surgery


Bruneau, Michaël; Appelboom, Geoffrey; Rynkowski, Michal; Cutsem, Nathalie; Mine, Benjamin; Witte, Olivier (2013). Endoscope-integrated ICG technology: first application during intracranial aneurysm surgery. Neurosurgical Review, 36(1):77-85.

Abstract

Microscopic indocyanine green videoangiography (mICG-VA) has gained wide acceptance during intracranial aneurysm surgery by lowering rates of incomplete clipping and occlusion of surrounding vessels. However, mICG-VA images are limited to the microscopic view and some deeper areas, including the aneurysm sac/neck posterior side, cannot be efficiently assessed as they are hidden by the aneurysm, clips, or surrounding structures. Contrarily, endoscopes allow a wider area of visualization, but neurosurgical endoscopes to date only provided visual data. We describe the first application of endoscope ICG-integrated technology (eICG) applied in an initial case of anterior communicating artery aneurysm clipping. This new technique provided also relevant information regarding aneurysm occlusion and patency of parent and branching vessels and small perforating arteries. eICG-VA provided additional information compared to mICG-VA by magnifying areas of interest and improving the ability to view less accessible regions, especially posterior to the aneurysm clip. Obtaining eICG sequences required currently the microscope to be moved away from the operating field. eICG-VA was only recorded under infrared illumination which prevented tissue handling, but white-infrared light views could be interchanged instantaneously. Further development of angled endoscopes integrating the ICG technology and dedicated filters blocking the microscopic light could improve visualization capacities even further. In conclusion, as a result of its ability to reveal structures around corners, the eICG-VA technology could be beneficial when used in combination with mICG-VA to visualize and confirm vessel patency in areas that were previously hidden from the microscope.

Abstract

Microscopic indocyanine green videoangiography (mICG-VA) has gained wide acceptance during intracranial aneurysm surgery by lowering rates of incomplete clipping and occlusion of surrounding vessels. However, mICG-VA images are limited to the microscopic view and some deeper areas, including the aneurysm sac/neck posterior side, cannot be efficiently assessed as they are hidden by the aneurysm, clips, or surrounding structures. Contrarily, endoscopes allow a wider area of visualization, but neurosurgical endoscopes to date only provided visual data. We describe the first application of endoscope ICG-integrated technology (eICG) applied in an initial case of anterior communicating artery aneurysm clipping. This new technique provided also relevant information regarding aneurysm occlusion and patency of parent and branching vessels and small perforating arteries. eICG-VA provided additional information compared to mICG-VA by magnifying areas of interest and improving the ability to view less accessible regions, especially posterior to the aneurysm clip. Obtaining eICG sequences required currently the microscope to be moved away from the operating field. eICG-VA was only recorded under infrared illumination which prevented tissue handling, but white-infrared light views could be interchanged instantaneously. Further development of angled endoscopes integrating the ICG technology and dedicated filters blocking the microscopic light could improve visualization capacities even further. In conclusion, as a result of its ability to reveal structures around corners, the eICG-VA technology could be beneficial when used in combination with mICG-VA to visualize and confirm vessel patency in areas that were previously hidden from the microscope.

Citations

11 citations in Web of Science®
13 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurosurgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:13 Mar 2014 15:30
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:43
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0344-5607
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10143-012-0419-9
PubMed ID:22918545

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