UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Patient acceptance and clinical impact of Bravo monitoring in patients with previous failed catheter-based studies


Sweis, R; Fox, M; Anggiansah, R; Anggiansah, A; Basavaraju, K; Canavan, R; Wong, T (2009). Patient acceptance and clinical impact of Bravo monitoring in patients with previous failed catheter-based studies. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 29(6):669-676.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Standard pH monitoring is performed over 24 h with a naso-oesophageal catheter (C-pH). Limitations include naso-pharyngeal discomfort, nausea and social embarrassment resulting in reduced reflux-provoking activities. Recently a catheter-free pH-monitoring technique has become available. The tolerability and diagnostic yield of this system in patients who failed standard monitoring remain unknown.
AIM: To examine the tolerability and diagnostic outcome of catheter-free pH-monitoring technique in patients who failed standard monitoring.
METHODS: Patients referred for C-pH and catheter-free pH monitoring completed a tolerability questionnaire. Acid exposure in the distal oesophagus and symptom index (SI) were reviewed.
RESULTS: Over 4 years, 883/1751 (50%) of patients with typical reflux symptoms referred for C-pH were diagnosed with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) based on a pathological percentage time acid exposure (%time pH <4);134 (8%) patients failed C-pH and, of these, 129 successfully completed 2-day catheter-free pH monitoring. Ninety-eight (76%) of these patients had a pathological percentage pH <4 on either day compared with 49/102 (49%) of contemporaneous C-pH patients (P < 0.01). There was no difference in SI for heartburn (35% vs. 42%; P = 0.49). The questionnaire demonstrated a preference for catheter-free pH monitoring (96%) with less restriction in activities of daily living, naso-pharyngeal discomfort, dysphagia and chest pain.
CONCLUSIONS: Tolerance and satisfaction with catheter-free pH monitoring are high in patients who had previously failed C-pH; catheter-free pH monitoring assists the definitive diagnosis of GERD in this group.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Standard pH monitoring is performed over 24 h with a naso-oesophageal catheter (C-pH). Limitations include naso-pharyngeal discomfort, nausea and social embarrassment resulting in reduced reflux-provoking activities. Recently a catheter-free pH-monitoring technique has become available. The tolerability and diagnostic yield of this system in patients who failed standard monitoring remain unknown.
AIM: To examine the tolerability and diagnostic outcome of catheter-free pH-monitoring technique in patients who failed standard monitoring.
METHODS: Patients referred for C-pH and catheter-free pH monitoring completed a tolerability questionnaire. Acid exposure in the distal oesophagus and symptom index (SI) were reviewed.
RESULTS: Over 4 years, 883/1751 (50%) of patients with typical reflux symptoms referred for C-pH were diagnosed with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) based on a pathological percentage time acid exposure (%time pH <4);134 (8%) patients failed C-pH and, of these, 129 successfully completed 2-day catheter-free pH monitoring. Ninety-eight (76%) of these patients had a pathological percentage pH <4 on either day compared with 49/102 (49%) of contemporaneous C-pH patients (P < 0.01). There was no difference in SI for heartburn (35% vs. 42%; P = 0.49). The questionnaire demonstrated a preference for catheter-free pH monitoring (96%) with less restriction in activities of daily living, naso-pharyngeal discomfort, dysphagia and chest pain.
CONCLUSIONS: Tolerance and satisfaction with catheter-free pH monitoring are high in patients who had previously failed C-pH; catheter-free pH monitoring assists the definitive diagnosis of GERD in this group.

Citations

21 citations in Web of Science®
24 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:21 Mar 2014 17:14
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:43
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0269-2813
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2036.2008.03923.x
PubMed ID:19183144

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations