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Explanation of the stacking disorder in the β-phase of Pigment Red 170


Teteruk, Jaroslav L; Glinnemann, Jürgen; Gorelik, Tatiana E; Linden, Anthony; Schmidt, Martin U (2014). Explanation of the stacking disorder in the β-phase of Pigment Red 170. Acta Crystallographica. Section B: Structural science, 70(2):296-305.

Abstract

The [beta]-phase of Pigment Red 170, C26H22N4O4, which is used industrially for the colouration of plastics, crystallizes in a layer structure with stacking disorder. The disorder is characterized by a lateral translational shift between the layers with a component ty of either +0.421 or -0.421. Order-disorder (OD) theory is used to derive the possible stacking sequences. Extensive lattice-energy minimizations were carried out on a large set of structural models with different stacking sequences, containing up to 2688 atoms. These calculations were used to determine the actual local structures and to derive the stacking probabilities. It is shown that local structures and energies depend not only on the arrangement of neighbouring layers, but also next-neighbouring layers. Large models with 100 layers were constructed according to the derived stacking probabilities. The diffraction patterns simulated from those models are in good agreement with the experimental single-crystal and powder diffraction patterns. Electron diffraction investigation on a nanocrystalline industrial sample revealed the same disorder. Hence the lattice-energy minimizations are able to explain the disorder and the diffuse scattering.

The [beta]-phase of Pigment Red 170, C26H22N4O4, which is used industrially for the colouration of plastics, crystallizes in a layer structure with stacking disorder. The disorder is characterized by a lateral translational shift between the layers with a component ty of either +0.421 or -0.421. Order-disorder (OD) theory is used to derive the possible stacking sequences. Extensive lattice-energy minimizations were carried out on a large set of structural models with different stacking sequences, containing up to 2688 atoms. These calculations were used to determine the actual local structures and to derive the stacking probabilities. It is shown that local structures and energies depend not only on the arrangement of neighbouring layers, but also next-neighbouring layers. Large models with 100 layers were constructed according to the derived stacking probabilities. The diffraction patterns simulated from those models are in good agreement with the experimental single-crystal and powder diffraction patterns. Electron diffraction investigation on a nanocrystalline industrial sample revealed the same disorder. Hence the lattice-energy minimizations are able to explain the disorder and the diffuse scattering.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:04 Apr 2014 09:27
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:47
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0108-7681
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1107/S2052520613031636
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-94547

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