UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Feasibility, safety, and efficacy of injectable heroin prescription for refractory opioid addicts: a follow-up study


Rehm, Jürgen; Gschwend, Patrick; Steffen, Thomas; Gutzwiller, Felix; Dobler-Mikola, Anja; Uchtenhagen, Ambros (2001). Feasibility, safety, and efficacy of injectable heroin prescription for refractory opioid addicts: a follow-up study. Lancet, 358:1417-1420.

Abstract

Background:
Heroin-assisted substitution treatment for severely opioid-dependent drug users has been available in Switzerland since 1994. Our aim was to ascertain the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of this treatment.
Methods:
We did a cohort study in 21 community outpatient treatment centres. We assessed 1969 opioid-dependent drug users, who began heroin-assisted substitution treatment between January, 1994, and December, 2000, to ascertain admission and discharge patterns, and patient characteristics. We also followed up a subset of 237 patients who began treatment between Jan 1, 1994, and March 31, 1995, and who stayed with the programme for at least 18 months. We used questionnaires, interviews, and medical examinations done at entry and after 6, 12, and 18 months to assess somatic and mental health, social integration, and treatment outcomes.
Findings:
More than 70% (1378) of patients remained in treatment for more than a year. Treatment showed positive effects with respect to health and social outcomes. A long stay in treatment was related to a higher chance of starting abstinence-oriented therapy than a short stay.
Interpretation:
Heroin-assisted substitution treatment might be an effective option for chronically addicted patients for whom other treatments have failed.

Background:
Heroin-assisted substitution treatment for severely opioid-dependent drug users has been available in Switzerland since 1994. Our aim was to ascertain the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of this treatment.
Methods:
We did a cohort study in 21 community outpatient treatment centres. We assessed 1969 opioid-dependent drug users, who began heroin-assisted substitution treatment between January, 1994, and December, 2000, to ascertain admission and discharge patterns, and patient characteristics. We also followed up a subset of 237 patients who began treatment between Jan 1, 1994, and March 31, 1995, and who stayed with the programme for at least 18 months. We used questionnaires, interviews, and medical examinations done at entry and after 6, 12, and 18 months to assess somatic and mental health, social integration, and treatment outcomes.
Findings:
More than 70% (1378) of patients remained in treatment for more than a year. Treatment showed positive effects with respect to health and social outcomes. A long stay in treatment was related to a higher chance of starting abstinence-oriented therapy than a short stay.
Interpretation:
Heroin-assisted substitution treatment might be an effective option for chronically addicted patients for whom other treatments have failed.

Citations

138 citations in Web of Science®
153 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 04 Jun 2014
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
04 Faculty of Medicine > Swiss Research Institute for Public Health and Addiction
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Follow-Up Studies;heroin;opioid;treatment
Language:English, German
Date:2001
Deposited On:04 Jun 2014 08:48
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:47
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0140-6736
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(01)06529-1
PubMed ID:11705488
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-94630

Download

[img]
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 87kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations