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Alcohol-attributable mortality and morbidity


Rehm, Jürgen; Gmel, Gerhard; Sempos, C T; Trevisan, M (2002). Alcohol-attributable mortality and morbidity. Alcohol Research and Health, 27(1):39-51.

Abstract

Alcohol use is related to a wide variety of negative health outcomes including morbidity, mortality, and disability. Research on alcohol-related morbidity and mortality takes into account the varying effects of overall alcohol consumption and drinking patterns. The results from this epidemiological research indicate that alcohol use increases the risk for many chronic health consequences (e.g., diseases) and acute consequences (e.g., traffic crashes), but a certain pattern of regular light-to-moderate drinking may have beneficial effects on coronary heart disease. Several issues are relevant to the methodology of studies of alcohol-related morbidity and mortality, including the measurement of both alcohol consumption and the outcomes studied as well as study design. Broad summary measures that reflect alcohol's possible effects on morbidity, mortality, and disability may be more useful than measures of any one outcome alone.

Abstract

Alcohol use is related to a wide variety of negative health outcomes including morbidity, mortality, and disability. Research on alcohol-related morbidity and mortality takes into account the varying effects of overall alcohol consumption and drinking patterns. The results from this epidemiological research indicate that alcohol use increases the risk for many chronic health consequences (e.g., diseases) and acute consequences (e.g., traffic crashes), but a certain pattern of regular light-to-moderate drinking may have beneficial effects on coronary heart disease. Several issues are relevant to the methodology of studies of alcohol-related morbidity and mortality, including the measurement of both alcohol consumption and the outcomes studied as well as study design. Broad summary measures that reflect alcohol's possible effects on morbidity, mortality, and disability may be more useful than measures of any one outcome alone.

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196 citations in Web of Science®
218 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Swiss Research Institute for Public Health and Addiction
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Morbidity;mortality
Language:English
Date:2002
Deposited On:16 Apr 2014 14:52
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:47
Publisher:U.S. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
ISSN:1535-7414
Free access at:Official URL. An embargo period may apply.
Official URL:http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh27-1/39-51.pdf
PubMed ID:15301399

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