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Vocal pitch matching ability in children between four and nine years of age


Stadler Elmer, Stefanie (1991). Vocal pitch matching ability in children between four and nine years of age. European Journal of High Ability, 1(1):33-41.

Abstract

Results from a developmental study on pitch matching ability (PMA) were used to draw conclusions on diagnostic and educational practice in music. Forty children from 3 age groups (4, 6, 8 years) participated in a cross‐sectional study with repeated measurements. The factor age was not important in the development of vocal PMA, whereas timbre of note presentation had strong effects on reproduction: Children in all age groups were more successful with vocal than with instrumental presentation. Remarkable were the large individual differences: There are 4‐year‐old children who hare higher ability than many 8‐year‐olds. Evidence is presented that actively produced music gives more valid insights into the individual's competence than the perceptually and verbally dominated traditional procedures for assessing PMA. Emphasis is thus placed on vocal activities because they are the earliest musical (and/or prosodic) expressions.

Results from a developmental study on pitch matching ability (PMA) were used to draw conclusions on diagnostic and educational practice in music. Forty children from 3 age groups (4, 6, 8 years) participated in a cross‐sectional study with repeated measurements. The factor age was not important in the development of vocal PMA, whereas timbre of note presentation had strong effects on reproduction: Children in all age groups were more successful with vocal than with instrumental presentation. Remarkable were the large individual differences: There are 4‐year‐old children who hare higher ability than many 8‐year‐olds. Evidence is presented that actively produced music gives more valid insights into the individual's competence than the perceptually and verbally dominated traditional procedures for assessing PMA. Emphasis is thus placed on vocal activities because they are the earliest musical (and/or prosodic) expressions.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:1991
Deposited On:09 Apr 2014 16:52
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:49
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1359-8139
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/0937445900010105

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