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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-9525

Schellenberg, S. Effects of hydrocortisone on systemic arterial blood pressure and urinary protein excretion and „white coat effect“ on blood pressure measurement in dogs. 2008, University of Zurich, Vetsuisse Faculty.

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Abstract

Hypertension and proteinuria are commonly recognized in dogs with spontaneous hypercortisolism. There is, however, little information regarding the effect of exogenous
glucocorticoids on blood pressure (BP) and proteinuria and whether these changes are reversible. Therefore the purpose of this study was to investigate if, how fast and to what
degree experimental exogenous hypercortisolism results in hypertenison and proteinuria, and whether this changes are reversible. Stress or anxiety associated with unknown people, an unfamiliar environment or the circumstances of the measurement, can result in a considerable increase in an animal’s BP. Therefore, in a first part, BP measurement was repeatedly performed in dogs over several weeks to investigate if and how much adaptation to the measurement procedure influences the results. In a second part, BP, urine protein:creatinine ratio (UPC), microalbuminuria (MALB), urine albumin:creatinine ratio (UAC) and urine gel
electrophoresis were evaluated in 12 Beagle dogs before, during and after administration of hydrocortisone (n=6, I-HC, 8mg/kg PO bid for 90 days) or placebo (n=6). During the adaptation period, the BP decreased gradually and significantly, and levelled out after 14 days. The median (range) of values obtained by Doppler were 166 (149 to
200) mmHg initially, 145 (119 to 176) mmHg on day 9, 138 (118 to 165) mmHg on day 10, 127 (111 to 139) mmHg on day 35, 124 (115 to 143) mmHg on day 94 and 127 (114 to 142) mmHg on day 161. All the later measurements were significantly lower than the initial measurement. Male dogs had higher BP than females on each occasion. In the second part, BP and UPC increased significantly during hydrocortisone administration from 123 mmHg (range 114-136 mmHg) and 0.17 (0.15-0.28) to a maximum of 143 mmHg (128-148 mmHg) and 0.38 (0.18-1.78), respectively on day 28.
MALB developed in four dogs and UAC significantly increased in all dogs with the maximum on day 84. Both, BP elevation and proteinuria were reversible and completely resolved within one month after stopping hydrocortisone administration. SDS-AGE revealed the proteinuria to be primarily albuminuria with a pronounced increase during
hydrocortisone treatment. Furthermore, a protein of 25-30 kDa was found in male dogs, identified by mass spectrometry to be arginine esterase, the major secretory prostatic
protein.
In conclusion, measurements of blood pressure may be erroneously high in dogs not familiar with the measurement procedure. Therefore, in a clinical setting the measurement of an elevated blood pressure should be confirmed by repeating the measurement on at least two additional occasions before hypertension is diagnosed and
antihypertensive treatment is started. Long-term hydrocortisone treatment, indeed, results in significant increases in systemic BP and urinary protein excretion. However, the changes are mild and in respect to BP, elevation to the point of systemic hypertension
did not occur. Furthermore, all changes were reversible within one month after discontinuation of hydrocortisone.

Item Type:Dissertation
Referees:Reusch C E, Lutz T A
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Physiology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals > Clinic for Small Animal Internal Medicine
DDC:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:05 Jan 2009 14:54
Last Modified:09 Jul 2012 03:32
Number of Pages:45
Related URLs:http://opac.nebis.ch/F/?local_base=NEBIS&con_lng=GER&func=find-b&find_code=SYS&request=005564872

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