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How does children's music making affect language and communication


Stadler Elmer, Stefanie (2009). How does children's music making affect language and communication. In: 7th Triennial Conference of European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music (ESCOM 2009), Jyväskylä, Finland, 2009 - 2009, 507-511.

Abstract

Low educations achievement is a risk to become socially excluded. What can music education contribute to children’s education? There is increasing evidence that children benefit from regular and playful musical stimulations from early in life. Among the beneficial domains are language and communication. A brief review on recent studies is given. Next, some problems related to traditional and static concepts of music and language are discussed. After outlining general theoretical assumptions about music and language, the earliest and simplest way of engaging in music and language is the main focus. Song singing and rhyming are both musical and linguistic. Both are founded on play; singing and rhyming are both playing with the timing of sounds in a generic way that is lacking in ordinary speech. Of central importance is the underlying emotional wellbeing related to these activities. Further studies into the co-evolution of vocal musical and linguistic communication should emphasize related emotional states.

Low educations achievement is a risk to become socially excluded. What can music education contribute to children’s education? There is increasing evidence that children benefit from regular and playful musical stimulations from early in life. Among the beneficial domains are language and communication. A brief review on recent studies is given. Next, some problems related to traditional and static concepts of music and language are discussed. After outlining general theoretical assumptions about music and language, the earliest and simplest way of engaging in music and language is the main focus. Song singing and rhyming are both musical and linguistic. Both are founded on play; singing and rhyming are both playing with the timing of sounds in a generic way that is lacking in ordinary speech. Of central importance is the underlying emotional wellbeing related to these activities. Further studies into the co-evolution of vocal musical and linguistic communication should emphasize related emotional states.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Event End Date:2009
Deposited On:14 May 2014 09:17
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:50
Publisher:European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music
Free access at:Official URL. An embargo period may apply.
Official URL:http://urn.fi/URN:NBN:fi:jyu-2009411323
Related URLs:http://www.escom.org/conferences-escom.html
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-95350

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