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Medienereignisse im sozialen Wandel


Imhof, Kurt (1992). Medienereignisse im sozialen Wandel. Schweizerische Zeitschrift für Soziologie = Revue Suisse de Sociologie = Swiss Journal of Sociology, 18(3):601-631.

Abstract

The paper deals with the significance of media coverage and the problem of measuring such coverage, in order to trace social change in modem societies. The same task faces the National Fund project described here, the object of which is to carry out a systematic study showing the most important events reported at national level in each independent or party newspaper of the Swiss-German press during the period 1910-1992. This will permit synchronic and diachronic comparisons of the reporting of events in the media. In addition, it will provide an indicator of social change, i. e. the extent to which a common theme is reported as the main subject reveals the regular pattern of social change concealed by the succession of social-crisis phases and structure-centred phases. Phases of crisis are the communication nodes in the socializing process. It is here that media content converges in the selection of a common theme, thus preparing the way, on the one hand, for conflict and, on the other, for conflict-reducing processes of rapprochement which, clearly dependent on difficulties of orientation and uncertainties, only become possible in the face of shared processes of thematic selection in a highly complex world. The evidence presented in this contribution is, quite naturally, limited to the example of certain marked characteristics of media coverage during the crisis years of the 1930s.

The paper deals with the significance of media coverage and the problem of measuring such coverage, in order to trace social change in modem societies. The same task faces the National Fund project described here, the object of which is to carry out a systematic study showing the most important events reported at national level in each independent or party newspaper of the Swiss-German press during the period 1910-1992. This will permit synchronic and diachronic comparisons of the reporting of events in the media. In addition, it will provide an indicator of social change, i. e. the extent to which a common theme is reported as the main subject reveals the regular pattern of social change concealed by the succession of social-crisis phases and structure-centred phases. Phases of crisis are the communication nodes in the socializing process. It is here that media content converges in the selection of a common theme, thus preparing the way, on the one hand, for conflict and, on the other, for conflict-reducing processes of rapprochement which, clearly dependent on difficulties of orientation and uncertainties, only become possible in the face of shared processes of thematic selection in a highly complex world. The evidence presented in this contribution is, quite naturally, limited to the example of certain marked characteristics of media coverage during the crisis years of the 1930s.

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Sociology
06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Mass Communication and Media Research
06 Faculty of Arts > Institute for Research on the Public Sphere and Society
Dewey Decimal Classification:300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
700 Arts
Language:German
Date:1992
Deposited On:30 Apr 2014 08:35
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:50
Publisher:Seismo Verlag
ISSN:0379-3664
Free access at:Related URL. An embargo period may apply.
Related URLs:http://www.sgs-sss.ch/de-sociojournal-archivsuche

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