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Reconstruction of the human visual system based on DTI fiber tracking


Staempfli, Philipp; Rienmueller, Anna; Reischauer, Carolin; Valavanis, Anton; Boesiger, Peter; Kollias, Spyridon (2007). Reconstruction of the human visual system based on DTI fiber tracking. Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (JMRI), 26(4):886-893.

Abstract

PURPOSE:
To apply and to evaluate the newly developed advanced fast marching algorithm (aFM) in vivo by reconstructing the human visual pathway, which is characterized by areas of extensive fiber crossing and branching, i.e., the optic chiasm and the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN).
MATERIALS AND METHODS:
Diffusion tensor images were acquired in 10 healthy volunteers. Due to the proximity to bony structures and air-filled spaces of the optic chiasm, a high sensitivity encoding (SENSE) reduction factor was applied to reduce image distortions in this area. To reconstruct the visual system, three different seed areas were chosen separately. The results obtained by the aFM tracking algorithm were compared and validated with known anatomy.
RESULTS:
The visual system could be reconstructed reproducibly in all subjects and the reconstructed fiber pathways are in good agreement with known anatomy.
CONCLUSION:
The present work shows that the advanced aFM, which is especially designed for overcoming tracking limitations within areas of extensive fiber crossing, handles the fiber crossing and branching within the optic chiasm and the LGN correctly, thus allowing the reconstruction of the entire human visual fiber pathway, from the intraorbital segment of the optic nerves to the visual cortex.

PURPOSE:
To apply and to evaluate the newly developed advanced fast marching algorithm (aFM) in vivo by reconstructing the human visual pathway, which is characterized by areas of extensive fiber crossing and branching, i.e., the optic chiasm and the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN).
MATERIALS AND METHODS:
Diffusion tensor images were acquired in 10 healthy volunteers. Due to the proximity to bony structures and air-filled spaces of the optic chiasm, a high sensitivity encoding (SENSE) reduction factor was applied to reduce image distortions in this area. To reconstruct the visual system, three different seed areas were chosen separately. The results obtained by the aFM tracking algorithm were compared and validated with known anatomy.
RESULTS:
The visual system could be reconstructed reproducibly in all subjects and the reconstructed fiber pathways are in good agreement with known anatomy.
CONCLUSION:
The present work shows that the advanced aFM, which is especially designed for overcoming tracking limitations within areas of extensive fiber crossing, handles the fiber crossing and branching within the optic chiasm and the LGN correctly, thus allowing the reconstruction of the entire human visual fiber pathway, from the intraorbital segment of the optic nerves to the visual cortex.

Citations

34 citations in Web of Science®
35 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2007
Deposited On:21 May 2014 07:27
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:51
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1053-1807
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/jmri.21098
PubMed ID:17896363

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