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Metabolic imaging of myocardial triglyceride content: reproducibility of 1H MR spectroscopy with respiratory navigator gating in volunteers


van der Meer, Rutger W; Doornbos, Joost; Kozerke, Sebastian; Schär, Michael; Bax, Jeroen J; Hammer, Sebastiaan; Smit, Johannes W A; Romijn, Johannes A; Diamant, Michaela; Rijzewijk, Luuk J; de Roos, Albert; Lamb, Hildo J (2007). Metabolic imaging of myocardial triglyceride content: reproducibility of 1H MR spectroscopy with respiratory navigator gating in volunteers. Radiology, 245(1):251-257.

Abstract

Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. The purpose of the study was to prospectively compare spectral resolution and reproducibility of hydrogen 1 (1H) magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy, with and without respiratory motion compensation based on navigator echoes, in the assessment of myocardial triglyceride content in the human heart. In 20 volunteers (14 men, six women; mean age+/-standard error, 31 years+/-2.8 [range, 19-60 years]; body mass index, 19-30 kg/m2) without history of cardiovascular disease, 1H MR spectroscopy of the myocardium was performed at rest, with and without respiratory motion compensation. Unsuppressed water signal linewidth changed from 11.9 Hz to 10.7 Hz (P<.001) with the use of the navigator, which indicated better spectral resolution. The navigator improved the intraclass correlation coefficient for the assessment of myocardial triglyceride content from 0.32 to 0.81. Therefore, the authors believe that respiratory motion correction is essential for reproducible assessment of myocardial triglycerides.

Abstract

Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. The purpose of the study was to prospectively compare spectral resolution and reproducibility of hydrogen 1 (1H) magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy, with and without respiratory motion compensation based on navigator echoes, in the assessment of myocardial triglyceride content in the human heart. In 20 volunteers (14 men, six women; mean age+/-standard error, 31 years+/-2.8 [range, 19-60 years]; body mass index, 19-30 kg/m2) without history of cardiovascular disease, 1H MR spectroscopy of the myocardium was performed at rest, with and without respiratory motion compensation. Unsuppressed water signal linewidth changed from 11.9 Hz to 10.7 Hz (P<.001) with the use of the navigator, which indicated better spectral resolution. The navigator improved the intraclass correlation coefficient for the assessment of myocardial triglyceride content from 0.32 to 0.81. Therefore, the authors believe that respiratory motion correction is essential for reproducible assessment of myocardial triglycerides.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2007
Deposited On:21 May 2014 07:30
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:51
Publisher:Radiological Society of North America
ISSN:0033-8419
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2451061904
PubMed ID:17885193

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