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Prescription drug abuse in Canada and the diversion of prescription drugs into the illicit drug market


Haydon, E; Rehm, J; Fischer, B; Monga, N; Adlaf, E (2005). Prescription drug abuse in Canada and the diversion of prescription drugs into the illicit drug market. Canadian Journal of Public Health. Revue Canadienne de Santé Publique, 96(6):459-461.

Abstract

Prescription drug abuse has received considerable attention in media reports in recent years. The purpose of this article is to describe the Canadian situation and context with regards to prescription drug abuse and the diversion of psychotropic prescription drugs into the illicit drug market, with a focus on the need for more data and interventions. Canada ranks within the top 10% of countries in the use of benzodiazepines, opioid prescriptions and stimulants. There are many ways that prescription drugs are diverted into the illicit market and varied reasons for use and abuse. Prescription drug abuse is further related to a number of negative consequences, including overdose. While seniors and women have been the primary focus for research in Canada on prescription drug abuse, adolescents and young adults have received less attention. Systematic epidemiological data specifically on prescription drug abuse in the Canada context are lacking and are needed in order to more clearly understand the reasons for the phenomenon and to develop and implement appropriate interventions.

Abstract

Prescription drug abuse has received considerable attention in media reports in recent years. The purpose of this article is to describe the Canadian situation and context with regards to prescription drug abuse and the diversion of psychotropic prescription drugs into the illicit drug market, with a focus on the need for more data and interventions. Canada ranks within the top 10% of countries in the use of benzodiazepines, opioid prescriptions and stimulants. There are many ways that prescription drugs are diverted into the illicit market and varied reasons for use and abuse. Prescription drug abuse is further related to a number of negative consequences, including overdose. While seniors and women have been the primary focus for research in Canada on prescription drug abuse, adolescents and young adults have received less attention. Systematic epidemiological data specifically on prescription drug abuse in the Canada context are lacking and are needed in order to more clearly understand the reasons for the phenomenon and to develop and implement appropriate interventions.

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24 citations in Web of Science®
30 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Swiss Research Institute for Public Health and Addiction
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Canada;abuse;drug;drug abuse
Language:English
Date:2005
Deposited On:06 Aug 2014 09:19
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:54
Publisher:Canadian Public Health Association
ISSN:0008-4263
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Official URL:http://journal.cpha.ca/index.php/cjph/article/view/646/646

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