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Grundlagen der Kosten-Nutzen-Analyse bei der Langzeitbehandlung von Risikofaktoren


Szucs, Thomas D; Gutzwiller, Felix (1998). Grundlagen der Kosten-Nutzen-Analyse bei der Langzeitbehandlung von Risikofaktoren. Swiss Medical Weekly, 128(49):1958-64.

Abstract

Health care decision makers are increasingly forced to identify and implement the options for potential spendings and savings. Historically, preventive measures for cardiovascular diseases have been scrutinised a great deal. The main reason for this was that substantial financial investments would have to be undertaken long before the clinical benefits were apparent. In the past, most economic evaluations of lipid lowering therapy have been based on models combining logistic regression risk functions from epidemiological cohort studies, such as the Framingham study, with the extent of cholesterol reduction. Recently, however, data from the large controlled outcome studies (4S, CARE, LIPID, WOSCOPS) have been reported which allow a direct estimate of the economic benefits of cholesterol reduction in primary and secondary prevention. The economic evaluation of such therapies can be performed in several ways, from relatively easy cost-consequence analyses to more complex cost-effectiveness analysis. Initial economic analyses of the trials are already available. There are, however, still considerable practical and methodological issues which have to be taken into account in assessing lipid lowering drugs. Available pharmaco-economic data on lipid lowering therapies suggest that statins are a cost-effective option in primary and secondary coronary prevention.

Abstract

Health care decision makers are increasingly forced to identify and implement the options for potential spendings and savings. Historically, preventive measures for cardiovascular diseases have been scrutinised a great deal. The main reason for this was that substantial financial investments would have to be undertaken long before the clinical benefits were apparent. In the past, most economic evaluations of lipid lowering therapy have been based on models combining logistic regression risk functions from epidemiological cohort studies, such as the Framingham study, with the extent of cholesterol reduction. Recently, however, data from the large controlled outcome studies (4S, CARE, LIPID, WOSCOPS) have been reported which allow a direct estimate of the economic benefits of cholesterol reduction in primary and secondary prevention. The economic evaluation of such therapies can be performed in several ways, from relatively easy cost-consequence analyses to more complex cost-effectiveness analysis. Initial economic analyses of the trials are already available. There are, however, still considerable practical and methodological issues which have to be taken into account in assessing lipid lowering drugs. Available pharmaco-economic data on lipid lowering therapies suggest that statins are a cost-effective option in primary and secondary coronary prevention.

Citations

1 citation in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Other titles:Basic principles of cost-benefit analysis in long-term treatment of risk factors
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:1998
Deposited On:10 Jun 2014 13:01
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:54
Publisher:EMH Swiss Medical Publishers
ISSN:0036-7672
PubMed ID:9887476

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