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Interplacental uterine expression of genes involved in prostaglandin synthesis during canine pregnancy and at induced prepartum luteolysis/abortion


Kowalewski, Mariusz P; Kautz, Ewa; Högger, Elisabeth; Hoffmann, Bernd; Boos, Alois (2014). Interplacental uterine expression of genes involved in prostaglandin synthesis during canine pregnancy and at induced prepartum luteolysis/abortion. Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, 12:46.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In the non-pregnant dog, ovarian cyclicity is independent of a uterine luteolysin. This is in contrast to pregnant animals where a prepartum increase of luteolytic PGF2alpha occurs, apparently originating in the pregnant uterus. Recently, the placenta as a source of prepartum prostaglandins (PGs) was investigated, indicating fetal trophoblast cells as the likely main source. However, the possible contribution of uterine interplacental tissues to the production of these hormones has not yet been thoroughly examined in the dog.
METHODS: Several key factors involved in the production and/or actions of PGs were studied: cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2, PTGS2), PGF2alpha-synthase (PGFS/AKR1C3), PGE2-synthase (PGES), and the respective receptors FP (PTGFR), EP2 (PTGER2) and EP4 (PGTER4), 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD), PG-transporter (PGT, SLCO2A1) and progesterone receptor. Their expression and localization patterns were assessed by Real Time PCR and immunohistology in the interplacental uterine sites from pregnant dogs during the pre-implantation period (days 8-12), post-implantation (days 18-25), mid-gestation (days 35-40) and during antigestagen-induced luteolysis/abortion.
RESULTS: Whereas only low COX2 expression was observed in uterine samples at all the selected time points, expression of PGFS/AKR1C3 strongly increased post-implantation. A gradual increase in PGES-mRNA expression was noted towards mid-gestation. FP-mRNA expression decreased significantly with the progression of pregnancy until mid-gestation. This was associated with clearly detectable expression of HPGD, which did not change significantly over time. The expression of FP and EP2-mRNA decreased significantly over time while EP4-mRNA expression remained unaffected. The antigestagen-treatment led to a significant increase in expression of COX2, PGES, EP2 and PGT (SLCO2A1) mRNA. COX2 was localized predominantly in the myometrium. The expression of PGFS/AKR1C3, which was unchanged, was localized mostly to the surface luminal epithelium. The expression of EP4, PGT and HPGH did not change during treatment, they were co-localized with PGES and EP2 in all uterine compartments.
CONCLUSIONS: The data clearly demonstrate the basic capability of the canine pregnant uterus to produce and respond to PGs and suggests their functions both as local regulatory factors involved in the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy, as well as potential contributors to the process of parturition, supporting the myometrial contractility associated with fetal expulsion.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In the non-pregnant dog, ovarian cyclicity is independent of a uterine luteolysin. This is in contrast to pregnant animals where a prepartum increase of luteolytic PGF2alpha occurs, apparently originating in the pregnant uterus. Recently, the placenta as a source of prepartum prostaglandins (PGs) was investigated, indicating fetal trophoblast cells as the likely main source. However, the possible contribution of uterine interplacental tissues to the production of these hormones has not yet been thoroughly examined in the dog.
METHODS: Several key factors involved in the production and/or actions of PGs were studied: cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2, PTGS2), PGF2alpha-synthase (PGFS/AKR1C3), PGE2-synthase (PGES), and the respective receptors FP (PTGFR), EP2 (PTGER2) and EP4 (PGTER4), 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD), PG-transporter (PGT, SLCO2A1) and progesterone receptor. Their expression and localization patterns were assessed by Real Time PCR and immunohistology in the interplacental uterine sites from pregnant dogs during the pre-implantation period (days 8-12), post-implantation (days 18-25), mid-gestation (days 35-40) and during antigestagen-induced luteolysis/abortion.
RESULTS: Whereas only low COX2 expression was observed in uterine samples at all the selected time points, expression of PGFS/AKR1C3 strongly increased post-implantation. A gradual increase in PGES-mRNA expression was noted towards mid-gestation. FP-mRNA expression decreased significantly with the progression of pregnancy until mid-gestation. This was associated with clearly detectable expression of HPGD, which did not change significantly over time. The expression of FP and EP2-mRNA decreased significantly over time while EP4-mRNA expression remained unaffected. The antigestagen-treatment led to a significant increase in expression of COX2, PGES, EP2 and PGT (SLCO2A1) mRNA. COX2 was localized predominantly in the myometrium. The expression of PGFS/AKR1C3, which was unchanged, was localized mostly to the surface luminal epithelium. The expression of EP4, PGT and HPGH did not change during treatment, they were co-localized with PGES and EP2 in all uterine compartments.
CONCLUSIONS: The data clearly demonstrate the basic capability of the canine pregnant uterus to produce and respond to PGs and suggests their functions both as local regulatory factors involved in the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy, as well as potential contributors to the process of parturition, supporting the myometrial contractility associated with fetal expulsion.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Anatomy
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:11 Jun 2014 11:06
Last Modified:31 Oct 2016 15:39
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1477-7827
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/1477-7827-12-46
PubMed ID:24884887

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