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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-9671

Hasler, G; van der Veen, J W; Geraci, M; Shen, J; Pine, D; Drevets, W C (2009). Prefrontal Cortical Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Levels in Panic Disorder Determined by Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Biological Psychiatry, 65(3):273-275.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Panic disorder (PD) is hypothesized to be associated with altered function of the major inhibitory neurotransmitter, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Previous proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies found lower GABA concentrations in the occipital cortex of subjects with PD relative to healthy control subjects. The current study is the first MRS study to compare GABA concentrations between unmedicated PD subjects and control subjects in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). METHODS: Unmedicated subjects with PD (n = 17) and age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects (n = 17) were scanned on a 3 Tesla scanner using a transmit-receive head coil that provided a sufficiently homogenous radiofrequency field to obtain spectroscopic measurements in the dorsomedial/dorsal anterolateral and ventromedial areas of the PFC. RESULTS: The prefrontal cortical GABA concentrations did not differ significantly between PD subjects and control subjects. There also was no statistically significant difference in glutamate/glutamine (Glx), choline, or N-acetyl aspartate concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: The previously reported finding of reduced GABA concentrations in the occipital cortex of PD subjects does not appear to extend to the PFC.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
DDC:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:February 2009
Deposited On:07 Jan 2009 14:47
Last Modified:27 Nov 2013 23:06
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0006-3223
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.biopsych.2008.06.023
PubMed ID:18692172
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 18
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