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Neurophysiological signs of rapidly emerging visual expertise for symbol strings


Brem, Silvia; Lang-Dullenkopf, Anette; Maurer, Urs; Halder, Pascal; Bucher, Kerstin; Brandeis, Daniel (2005). Neurophysiological signs of rapidly emerging visual expertise for symbol strings. NeuroReport, 16(1):45-8.

Abstract

The current study examined whether the repeated visual presentation of novel, meaningless symbol strings triggers rapid changes in event related potentials (ERP). Adult participants performed three versions of a word and symbol string repetition detection task in the same experimental session. Analyses focussed on the occipito-temporal N1 (approximately 150 ms) known to reflect early word-specific processing and stimulus categorisation. While the N1 to words did not change, the occipito-temporal negativity to symbol strings increased over runs and converged with the word N1. Later (approximately 220 ms) more positive occipito-temporal amplitudes to repeated words in the third compared to the first run implied a repetition priming effect. This suggests that symbol string processing changed over time due to visual learning and increased perceptual expertise.

Abstract

The current study examined whether the repeated visual presentation of novel, meaningless symbol strings triggers rapid changes in event related potentials (ERP). Adult participants performed three versions of a word and symbol string repetition detection task in the same experimental session. Analyses focussed on the occipito-temporal N1 (approximately 150 ms) known to reflect early word-specific processing and stimulus categorisation. While the N1 to words did not change, the occipito-temporal negativity to symbol strings increased over runs and converged with the word N1. Later (approximately 220 ms) more positive occipito-temporal amplitudes to repeated words in the third compared to the first run implied a repetition priming effect. This suggests that symbol string processing changed over time due to visual learning and increased perceptual expertise.

Citations

47 citations in Web of Science®
45 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:19 January 2005
Deposited On:23 Jul 2014 12:08
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:59
Publisher:Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0959-4965
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/00001756-200501190-00011
PubMed ID:15618888

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