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Review of the objective achievement motivation test


Brandstätter, Veronika (2005). Review of the objective achievement motivation test. Zeitschrift für Personalpsychologie, 4(3):132-137.

Abstract

Objective Achievement Motivation Test (Objektiver Leistungsmotivations-Test; OLMT) is a computer-based test that measures objective performance for different sets of instructions, that is, in situations with different incentives for achievement (doing your best, setting individual goals, competing against a fictitious other person). Performance in the test is interpreted as an indicator of a person's general tendency to make an effort and thus of his or her achievement motivation. The OLMT has been developed on the basis of current conceptions of achievement motivation theory. The test has been designed for use in the selection of personnel and in career counselling, as well as in empirical studies in the context of work, organizational, and sport psychology. Applying the test, scoring it, and the instructions for the interpretation of test results are very clear and user-friendly. Norms for three age groups (18-49 years, 50-64 years, 65 years and older) are provided, based upon a representative German-speaking sample. So far, the OLMT has been validated against different cognitive tests and school performance. Studies comparing the OLMT with alternative measures of achievement motivation are still lacking. Since the instructions for the task motivate the person being tested to invest maximum effort, further studies will have to demonstrate h hievement motivation rather than sensor-motoric competence under these instructions.

Objective Achievement Motivation Test (Objektiver Leistungsmotivations-Test; OLMT) is a computer-based test that measures objective performance for different sets of instructions, that is, in situations with different incentives for achievement (doing your best, setting individual goals, competing against a fictitious other person). Performance in the test is interpreted as an indicator of a person's general tendency to make an effort and thus of his or her achievement motivation. The OLMT has been developed on the basis of current conceptions of achievement motivation theory. The test has been designed for use in the selection of personnel and in career counselling, as well as in empirical studies in the context of work, organizational, and sport psychology. Applying the test, scoring it, and the instructions for the interpretation of test results are very clear and user-friendly. Norms for three age groups (18-49 years, 50-64 years, 65 years and older) are provided, based upon a representative German-speaking sample. So far, the OLMT has been validated against different cognitive tests and school performance. Studies comparing the OLMT with alternative measures of achievement motivation are still lacking. Since the instructions for the task motivate the person being tested to invest maximum effort, further studies will have to demonstrate h hievement motivation rather than sensor-motoric competence under these instructions.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2005
Deposited On:13 Aug 2014 13:15
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:01
Publisher:Hogrefe & Huber
ISSN:1617-6391
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1026/1617-6391.4.3.132

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