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Sleep ability mediates individual differences in the vulnerability to sleep loss: evidence from a PER3 polymorphism


Maire, M; Reichert, C F; Gabel, V; Viola, A U; Strobel, W; Krebs, J; Landolt, H P; Bachmann, V; Cajochen, C; Schmidt, C (2014). Sleep ability mediates individual differences in the vulnerability to sleep loss: evidence from a PER3 polymorphism. Cortex, 52:47-59.

Abstract

Sleep deprivation is highly prevalent in our 24/7 society with harmful consequences on daytime functioning on the individual level. Genetically determined, trait-like vulnerability contributes to prominent inter-individual variability in the behavioral responses to sleep loss and adverse circadian phase. We aimed at investigating the effects of differential sleep pressure levels (high vs low) on the circadian modulation of neurobehavioral performance, sleepiness correlates, and nap sleep in individuals genotyped for a polymorphism in the clock gene PERIOD3. Fourteen homozygous long (PER3(5/5)) and 15 homozygous short (PER3(4/4)) allele carriers underwent both a 40-h sleep deprivation and multiple nap protocol under controlled laboratory conditions. We compared genotypes regarding subjective and ocular correlates of sleepiness, unintentional sleep episodes as well as psychomotor vigilance during both protocols. Nap sleep was monitored by polysomnography and visually scored according to standard criteria. The detrimental effects of high sleep pressure on sleepiness correlates and psychomotor vigilance were more pronounced in PER3(5/5) than PER3(4/4) carriers. Under low sleep pressure, both groups showed similar circadian time courses. Concomitantly, nap sleep efficiency and subjective sleep quality across all naps tended to be higher in the more vulnerable PER3(5/5) carriers. In addition, PER3-dependent sleep-loss-related attentional lapses were mediated by sleep efficiency across the circadian cycle. Our data corroborate a greater detrimental impact of sleep deprivation in PER3(5/5) compared to PER3(4/4) carriers. They further suggest that the group with greater attentional performance impairment due to sleep deprivation (PER3(5/5) carriers) is superior at initiating sleep over the 24-h cycle. This higher sleep ability may mirror a faster sleep pressure build-up between the multiple sleep opportunities and thus a greater flexibility in sleep initiation. Finally, our data show that this higher nap sleep efficiency is positively related to attentional failures under sleep loss conditions and might thus be used as a marker for inter-individual vulnerability to elevated sleep pressure.

Sleep deprivation is highly prevalent in our 24/7 society with harmful consequences on daytime functioning on the individual level. Genetically determined, trait-like vulnerability contributes to prominent inter-individual variability in the behavioral responses to sleep loss and adverse circadian phase. We aimed at investigating the effects of differential sleep pressure levels (high vs low) on the circadian modulation of neurobehavioral performance, sleepiness correlates, and nap sleep in individuals genotyped for a polymorphism in the clock gene PERIOD3. Fourteen homozygous long (PER3(5/5)) and 15 homozygous short (PER3(4/4)) allele carriers underwent both a 40-h sleep deprivation and multiple nap protocol under controlled laboratory conditions. We compared genotypes regarding subjective and ocular correlates of sleepiness, unintentional sleep episodes as well as psychomotor vigilance during both protocols. Nap sleep was monitored by polysomnography and visually scored according to standard criteria. The detrimental effects of high sleep pressure on sleepiness correlates and psychomotor vigilance were more pronounced in PER3(5/5) than PER3(4/4) carriers. Under low sleep pressure, both groups showed similar circadian time courses. Concomitantly, nap sleep efficiency and subjective sleep quality across all naps tended to be higher in the more vulnerable PER3(5/5) carriers. In addition, PER3-dependent sleep-loss-related attentional lapses were mediated by sleep efficiency across the circadian cycle. Our data corroborate a greater detrimental impact of sleep deprivation in PER3(5/5) compared to PER3(4/4) carriers. They further suggest that the group with greater attentional performance impairment due to sleep deprivation (PER3(5/5) carriers) is superior at initiating sleep over the 24-h cycle. This higher sleep ability may mirror a faster sleep pressure build-up between the multiple sleep opportunities and thus a greater flexibility in sleep initiation. Finally, our data show that this higher nap sleep efficiency is positively related to attentional failures under sleep loss conditions and might thus be used as a marker for inter-individual vulnerability to elevated sleep pressure.

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10 citations in Web of Science®
14 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:March 2014
Deposited On:20 Aug 2014 13:31
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:20
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0010-9452
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cortex.2013.11.008
PubMed ID:24439663
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-98223

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