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Understanding cross-country differences in exporter premia: comparable evidence for 14 countries


Kaiser, U (2008). Understanding cross-country differences in exporter premia: comparable evidence for 14 countries. Review of World Economics, 144(4):596-635.

Abstract

We use comparable micro level panel data for 14 countries and a set of identically specified empirical models to investigate the relationship between exports and productivity. Our overall results are in line with the big picture that is by now familiar from the literature: exporters are more productive than non-exporters when observed and unobserved heterogeneity is controlled for, and these exporter productivity premia tend to increase with the share of exports in total sales; there is evidence in favour of self-selection of more productive firms into export markets, but nearly no evidence in favour of the learning-by-exporting hypothesis. We document that the
exporter premia differ considerably across countries in identically specified empirical models. In a meta-analysis of our results we find, consistently with theoretical
predictions, that productivity premia are larger in countries with lower export participation rates, with more restrictive trade policies, lower per capita GDP, less
effective government and worse regulatory quality, and in countries exporting to relatively more distant markets.

We use comparable micro level panel data for 14 countries and a set of identically specified empirical models to investigate the relationship between exports and productivity. Our overall results are in line with the big picture that is by now familiar from the literature: exporters are more productive than non-exporters when observed and unobserved heterogeneity is controlled for, and these exporter productivity premia tend to increase with the share of exports in total sales; there is evidence in favour of self-selection of more productive firms into export markets, but nearly no evidence in favour of the learning-by-exporting hypothesis. We document that the
exporter premia differ considerably across countries in identically specified empirical models. In a meta-analysis of our results we find, consistently with theoretical
predictions, that productivity premia are larger in countries with lower export participation rates, with more restrictive trade policies, lower per capita GDP, less
effective government and worse regulatory quality, and in countries exporting to relatively more distant markets.

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66 citations in Web of Science®
81 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Contributors:International Study Group on Exports and Productivity
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Business Administration
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Language:English
Date:December 2008
Deposited On:08 Jan 2009 14:55
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:48
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1610-2878
Additional Information:The International Study Group on Exports and Productivity (ISGEP) consists of teams working with firm (establishment or enterprise) level data from 14 countries. The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s10290-008-0163-y
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-9823

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